Drinking from the fermenter

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Pineys

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Hi Guys, Just curious.

I am currently running double batches with 2 x 30L HDPE's then pressure transferring to 50L SS Keg.

Wondering if it is possible to have something like a 30L Fermzilla (Or 2) where i can simply move from ferment chamber to keg fridge and charge it up and tap right of the fermzilla without transferring to SS?
I am thinking the only issue could be picking up yeast/sediment.

Keen to know if anyone has success with this model?

Cheers
 

duncbrewer

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You need a big fridge, a floating dip tube and then dump the yeast and trub as you go works fine. But then what are you going to brew in.
I use the fermentasaurus's to ferment in, keg some of the 30 litres and then bottle / drink the rest.
 

Grmblz

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KK do a FKJ (fermenter king junior) it's basically a 18L PET cornie keg, ferment, transfer to serving fridge, and you're done, as above ^ floating dip tube, and consume within a couple of weeks, no need to rack off providing it's consumed quickly enough, as a trial do a ferment in a cornie, and use the same process.
 

Pineys

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KK do a FKJ (fermenter king junior) it's basically a 18L PET cornie keg, ferment, transfer to serving fridge, and you're done, as above ^ floating dip tube, and consume within a couple of weeks, no need to rack off providing it's consumed quickly enough, as a trial do a ferment in a cornie, and use the same process.
Yeah i am doing 23L Batches which is why i was thinking the 30L PET Firmzilla. That will fit in my serving fridge no worries. I currently fit a 50L SS and 2 x 19L Corney style. I am interested in your statement about making sure its consumed within a few weeks. Can you please elaborate on this?
Cheers
 

duncbrewer

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Yeah i am doing 23L Batches which is why i was thinking the 30L PET Firmzilla. That will fit in my serving fridge no worries. I currently fit a 50L SS and 2 x 19L Corney style. I am interested in your statement about making sure its consumed within a few weeks. Can you please elaborate on this?
Cheers
I think this is suggested because the FKJ he mentions is really a PET keg and the beer sits on the yeast and trub so could provide off flavours, not so much a problem if you drop the trub and yeast out using a fermzilla ( which I think is what you are asking about ). I'd still ferment in this under pressure and then transfer to a keg once volume was correct for a keg and get brewing something else. They are quite expensive " kegs ", but ferment well.
 

Markbeer

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The Cornical from blichmann to me is the best solution.

But it's expensive.

I have been waiting for a similar product that's cheaper. None yet.
 

duncbrewer

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The Cornical from blichmann to me is the best solution.

But it's expensive.

I have been waiting for a similar product that's cheaper. None yet.
Have just watched the video for this. You have to turn the fermenter upside down after dropping the yeast, remove the bottom cone, exposing the beer to the air and then attach the " keg " base.
How on earth this would work with pressure fermenting I do not know. Certainly more oxygen exposure than I like in my beer production.
If you want stainless steel conical fermenter just buy one and a keg to transfer into. You'd need a big fridge for this and I can't see how a glycol system would fit into it either.
Think I'd rather have several fermentasaurus and kegs for the money, plus I can see what's happening in my fermenter.
 

RobB

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Have just watched the video for this. You have to turn the fermenter upside down after dropping the yeast, remove the bottom cone, exposing the beer to the air and then attach the " keg " base.
How on earth this would work with pressure fermenting I do not know. Certainly more oxygen exposure than I like in my beer production.
If you want stainless steel conical fermenter just buy one and a keg to transfer into. You'd need a big fridge for this and I can't see how a glycol system would fit into it either.
Think I'd rather have several fermentasaurus and kegs for the money, plus I can see what's happening in my fermenter.
Agreed on the Blichmann cornical. Flipping and changing base will undo just about every benefit of fermenting in a so-called unitank.

Williamswarn’s brewkegs look like they get it right, but they’re expensive. They look pretty high spec and are aimed at commercial users as well as home brewers, which probably explains the price. Something similar designed around a Cornelius keg would be awesome.
 

Markbeer

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It's been tested and dissolve O2 was lower in the beer from the blichmann product than a closed transfer.

It wasn't figured out if it was the yeast still in the beer, or if just flipping it once introduced less oxygen and that co2 was all that there was in the fermenter when this took place.

I think it was fermented under pressure too. So the flip was in c02 environment.

Did a quick look but can't find the study easily.

I like it because it didn't involve lots of extra steps and gas purging.

If I knew a supplier would be reliable in Australia id try one.

I use stainless steel fermenters already so have gotten used to not seeing what's happening.


Have just watched the video for this. You have to turn the fermenter upside down after dropping the yeast, remove the bottom cone, exposing the beer to the air and then attach the " keg " base.
How on earth this would work with pressure fermenting I do not know. Certainly more oxygen exposure than I like in my beer production.
If you want stainless steel conical fermenter just buy one and a keg to transfer into. You'd need a big fridge for this and I can't see how a glycol system would fit into it either.
Think I'd rather have several fermentasaurus and kegs for the money, plus I can see what's happening in my fermenter.
 

duncbrewer

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Seeing is believing, I'd spend the money elsewhere until I could have a Dissolved oxygen test on my closed transfer. Opening a fermenter with 30 psi of head pressure (as it's rated to that I think you said) could be very exciting/ dangerous.
People have been injured with corney keg lids flying off when not secured or failed under pressure and they suggest popping the lid off, bonne chance.
 

Markbeer

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Agreed. If i find the thread where they did the test I'll reference it here. Was done with a DO meter.


Seeing is believing, I'd spend the money elsewhere until I could have a Dissolved oxygen test on my closed transfer. Opening a fermenter with 30 psi of head pressure (as it's rated to that I think you said) could be very exciting/ dangerous.
People have been injured with corney keg lids flying off when not secured or failed under pressure and they suggest popping the lid off, bonne chance.
 

duncbrewer

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@Markbeer

Maybe this ?


and who knows the rigour of this statement from Blichmann or it's relevance really

"After fermentation there is nearly zero oxygen in the beer or head space. So the flipping process is done completely in an oxygen free environment! Of course it is important to exchange the conical bottom to the keg bottom as quickly as possible to minimize air mixing with the CO2. Even though CO2 is heavier than air, it will mix with air fairly quickly. But fortunately the dissolution of gasses in liquids is very slow. So when you flip the keg back over, there will be some air/O2 contact with the beer in large bubbles. But you will purge all this air out as you do with any keg with 4-5 pressurizations and releases of the pressure relief valve. "

Not convinced on the quality of the science. Opening the fermenter will let oxygen in regardless, just take a bottle of hoppy beer take the lid off for 30 seconds and then put a new lid back on, compare it a few weeks later to one not opened. You'll see and taste a difference.
 

Markbeer

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True true.

I just don't want to have to serve 19 litres of Star San out so then I can get it filled with beer. (Purging)

If it becomes reliably available I am going to get one to try.

@Markbeer

Maybe this ?


and who knows the rigour of this statement from Blichmann or it's relevance really

"After fermentation there is nearly zero oxygen in the beer or head space. So the flipping process is done completely in an oxygen free environment! Of course it is important to exchange the conical bottom to the keg bottom as quickly as possible to minimize air mixing with the CO2. Even though CO2 is heavier than air, it will mix with air fairly quickly. But fortunately the dissolution of gasses in liquids is very slow. So when you flip the keg back over, there will be some air/O2 contact with the beer in large bubbles. But you will purge all this air out as you do with any keg with 4-5 pressurizations and releases of the pressure relief valve. "

Not convinced on the quality of the science. Opening the fermenter will let oxygen in regardless, just take a bottle of hoppy beer take the lid off for 30 seconds and then put a new lid back on, compare it a few weeks later to one not opened. You'll see and taste a difference.
 

Gollywog

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I just use the Co2 produced by the fermentation of my current beer to push out a bit of star san in the bottom

Process is:
Start ferment, wait 1-2 days for initial Co2 to release. As I understand it, this has a lot of volatiles we may not want.
day 3 or so - attach disconnect line from fermenter to gas side of keg. Then attach another disconnect and line to the liquid side of keg, with the line coming out into a bottle of star san. There is a litre or so of star san in the bottle of the keg which will get pushed out quite quickly.
As the fermentation continues for a few days, i figure I've had a lot of Co2 being pumped through my keg and out into the bottle of star san.
Purged keg, purged disconnects from keg to fermenter. No oxygen introduced at any stage.

on my last ferment i did this with, i released the PRV of the keg - and got a sweet smell from the gas coming out. This was for a stout using US05.
Not sure if the sweet smell is a bad thing, or its perfectly fine. Will be tapping the keg in another week and will find out!
 

Ballaratguy

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I daisy chain a couple of kegs with a spunding valve on the last one
Can purge the kegs 3 times and still have enough co2 in them to allow O2 free transfer when finished. (Pressure fermenting)
 

duncbrewer

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I daisy chain a couple of kegs with a spunding valve on the last one
Can purge the kegs 3 times and still have enough co2 in them to allow O2 free transfer when finished. (Pressure fermenting)
Agreed no cost to purge the starsan using ferment gas.
IMG_20210513_000730.jpg
 

mynameisrodney

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The cost will be to my marriage if I start daisy chaining kegs across the laundry where the fermenting fridge is.
 

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