Do online recipes assume a general brewhouse efficiency?

Australia & New Zealand Homebrewing Forum

Help Support Australia & New Zealand Homebrewing Forum:

paddy.odwyer

Member
Joined
22/9/20
Messages
13
Reaction score
1
Location
Sydney, Australia
Hi there,

I'm gearing up for my 4th brew (BIAB) and I've decided to delve a little deeper into the intricacies of the recipe...

Some recipes on brewer's friend will give an assumed brewhouse efficiency percentage with the specific recipe. However, other recipes (particularly ones on a homebrew blog website, see link below for example) don't give any reference to a particular brewhouse efficiency.

My question is.... is it common knowledge that when a recipe does not explicitly state a BHE %, that it is somewhere between 72-76%? Also, when recipes don't explicitly state what process they use, is it assumed that you are an all-grain brewer, not BIAB?

Finally, when I find such a recipe that doesn't state a BHE or brewing method, should I offset my grain bill to be slightly less to accomodate for the fact that I am doing BIAB and therefore will have a slightly higher efficiency and by extension a higher potential gravity.

Hope that is somewhat clear.

Thanks, Paddy.

Link to a recipe which demonstrates lack of BHE % and brewing method : Dusty Mud Irish-Style Stout | Beer Recipe | American Homebrewers Association
 

philrob

Moderator
Staff member
Moderating
Joined
17/2/18
Messages
395
Reaction score
294
Location
NSW
I don't follow other published recipes.
However, if I was to do so, I would put the recipe into the software I use (BeerSmith 3) and see whether the predicted outcome is similar to the published recipe. The software, as I assume others will also, allows me to then adjust quantities on my known efficiencies for my system.
 

MHB

Well-Known Member
Joined
1/10/05
Messages
6,613
Reaction score
4,040
Location
Newcastle
Its a good point, I also agree with philrob, way better to make sure what you are doing is right for your system.
If you look at some recipe books or magazines like the BYO 200 (300 now) they give you a set of standard assumptions somewhere close to the start, given that makes it easier. I suspect most of the better websites would have something similar somewhere if you can find it.

Not so sure about some of your other assumptions. BIAB is all grain but classic mash tun lautered systems can be more efficient, extract yields in the low to mid 90's% aren't even all that difficult. We generally have to stop before we get all the extract because of rising levels of tannin extraction but have seen well made home brewing systems that routinely get 95% BHE and make very good beer.
BIAB has some limitations that would make that a big ask.

Mark
 

elmoMakesBeer

Well-Known Member
Joined
26/7/20
Messages
46
Reaction score
27
Location
Melbourne
To calculate the BHE you could work it out by hand/spreadsheet if you know or guess the malts' extract yield or potential. An easier option is to use an app or online calculator. Using the free app Wort I calculated the BHE for the linked recipe to be 76.5% (OG 1.038) to 84.6% (OG 1.042) for the fermentables listed and 23 litre batch.
 

kadmium

Pro
Pro
Joined
12/3/07
Messages
1,000
Reaction score
679
Hey mate.

I don't think there is a standard efficiency that people use. By entering in the recipe to beersmith or Brewfather, I'm pretty certain you can then scale it to your system and fiddle the numbers until you hit the same OG.

Also agreed with MHB and Philrob that Mash + Sparge is more efficient than BIAB. The advantage to BIAB for efficiency is that you can crush very fine.

Also be cautious when entering recipes that you use the same malts. If you can't get those exact malts, think about what substitution you can make to get a similar outcome.

There was a thread about substitution of Gladfield malt on here where MHB and some others gave good info regarding substitution of malts for flavour vs colour.
 

JDW81

I make wort, the yeast make it beer.
Joined
19/1/11
Messages
2,265
Reaction score
887
I think it would depend on the recipe source.

I know all the recipes in brewing classic styles by JZ/JP are based on an efficiency of 65% (I think they refer to overall efficiency, but can't remember exactly). I'll try and track down my copy of the book and find out.
 

Latest posts

Top