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TidalPete

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I notice that in this thread that a few of us who do 23 litre batches fill a keg & bottle the rest.
My question is this:- Do any of the above notice any difference in taste between a kegged or a bottled beer in the same batch? I've been led to believe that kegging improves the taste of an AG beer. Honest answers please. :rolleyes:

:beer:
 

AndrewQLD

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Hi Pete,
From my experience the kegged beer is better than the same beer bottled, I wonder if the difference is caused by the kegged beer once it's gassed and in the fridge does not ferment anymore, and perhaps the bottled beer still, over a period of time continues to ferment the minute traces of sugars left in the brew.
All I know is that my kegged stuff tastes better than the bottled version.

And maybe it's all in my head :blink:

Cheers
Andrew
 

TidalPete

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AndrewQLD said:
Hi Pete,
From my experience the kegged beer is better than the same beer bottled, I wonder if the difference is caused by the kegged beer once it's gassed and in the fridge does not ferment anymore, and perhaps the bottled beer still, over a period of time continues to ferment the minute traces of sugars left in the brew.
All I know is that my kegged stuff tastes better than the bottled version.

And maybe it's all in my head

Cheers
Andrew
[post="76323"][/post]​
I was thinking along similar lines Andrew. I'm afraid that kegging is a fair way off for me at the moment. :( Still got to get a fermentation fridge & make up my brewstand. That's why I'll be hanging around your setup at your Big Brewday. :p

:beer:
 

pint of lager

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Good question.

Have never sampled the same product from the bottle and from the keg at the same time.

The bottled stuff does change over time. I suspect that Andrewqld has hit upon the correct answer. Unfortunately, I don't have the fridge space to keep all my kegs and bottles at the right temp. A big cellar would be ideal.

I like kegging half and bottling half, it means there is usually a good supply of different beers on hand, besides what is in the keg.
 

Darren

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Perhaps you take more care with the kegged beer and the bottled beer is treated like "dregs".
 

barfridge

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In my limted kegging experience I've noticed the same thing. Beer seems to retain hop aromas better in a keg.
 

Ross

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I've tried several comparisons side by side & absolutly no doubt to my tastes - Keg is much better, especially for ales which IMO are best drunk young...
 

Offline

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I bottle some of each batch, not AG yet. So have done many side-by-side comparisons. Keg is definitely better!! For some reason my keg beer keeps a much better head, all the way to the bottom leaving tide lines, were as the bottle beer starts alright then disappears. I clean the kegs and bottles at the same time with the same stuff??
 

Brizbrew

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The next step I am going to take is to get in to kegging. How much would a basic setup cost (Ball park figure) and are there any ongoing associated costs?

It is a fair way off yet before I make the move over, probably next year but it is never too early to start investigating. :unsure:
 

muga

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The standard seems to be $399, this will get you a two keg setup.
Ongoing costs are; C02 bottle hire & refills.. thats about it.
 

Snow

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I really think it depends on the type of beer you are kegging/bottling. I've found that standard ales (Australian sparkling, Brittish bitters, American pales, etc) are definitely better in the kegged form and are best fresh. Stouts, robust porter, some weizens and most Belgian ales all improve with some time in the bottle, IMO. Some of the dominant flavours (eg roast malts, spices, special yeast phenols, etc) just take time to mellow and blend with the other flavours, and often this can only be done at cellar temps (12-16c) with yeast present.

However, I'm not usually patient enough to wait for bottles to condition, so I like to keg half and bottle half of these types of brews.

Cheers - Snow
 

peas_and_corn

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This is making me really want to get a kegging setup! the thing is, I might not have enough room in my fridge! Maybe it's time for an upgrade...
 

BrissyBrew

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The Magic Process of Maturation

Ok some of my thoughts or questions.
Yes some types of beers are best kegged and others best bottled.
Now for the interesting question Why?

Some thoughts which could be tested if you had access to some really large bottles and some mini/micro kegs.

I think that flavours come together better in larger vats, that's why I think some larger breweries using large bright tanks can speed up the maturation process. Thus keg is bigger than the bottle hence flavours come together quicker. That's why largering is best done in the secondary and largering in the bottle is not as effective.

Now I assume all chemical reactions dont occure at the same speed. Hence small bottles might be better for longer periods. The slower reactions have time to work, however due to the smaller volume the fast acting ones have not reacted as quickly as they would in a larger tank (eg the keg).

So lets take an Ale for an example (Australian sparkling, I will leave super strong ales out of this equation). One of my friends does 30 to 25L batches, he always kegs one half about 19L this means that he bottles the rest so I have done side by side comparisions. (Note I would like to really test this theory by force carbonating then counter pressure filling a few bottles).

A couple weeks in the keg the ale is great, but in the bottle it still a bit green!
Possible causes, bottle fermentation means you need to wait until fermentation has stopped completely then take that as day zero to make a comparision with the keg. My other theory is size of container. (most likely I suspect it is a combination of both.

Lets take a larger. I think freshness is not required here, there is something of a softing over time (to a point), I just dont think the keg lasts the distance as opposed to bottles (probably due to weak will power more than anything else). I think the bottle conditioning ensures that the yeast have disposed of any left 02 and storage and shelf life improves.

As an aside of the the guys at my brewclub has a barleywine sitting in a keg now for over 5 years and it tastes great.

Sorry enough of my ramblings but I would really love to see the science behind these processes explained.
 

Ross

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Brizzybrew

I don't think that it's so much that some beers are better in the bottle, rather that beers which take a long time to mature are usually bottled, as not many want to tie up their kegs for long periods - If space & cost were no issue, I don't think bottles would ever come out ahead of kegs...

Just my 2c worth...
 

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