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Decoction Mashing Question

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Snow

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Guys,

in a decoction mash, when you extract the decoction bit, is the actual grains and wort boiled before circulating back into the mash, or is it just wort? Also, how long should it be boiled?

Cheers - Snow
 
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Andrew Clark

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Hi Snow'
From postings that I have seen by decoction mashers 10 - 20 minutes depending on the amount of coloring or browning you want, you will need to heat wort and grains together and bring to the boil, What is the reason for you decocting, are you using undermodified malts, as this was the main reason european brewers used this method.
There is also the flavor and color differences due to the maillard effect of heating the wort and grains. You will probably find your brew to be much more malty in flavour and aroma than usual.
Hope this helps
Andrew Clark
 

Snow

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Thanks Andrew,

I am doing an Oktoberfest partial mash, using German Pilsener malt , Dark Munich and cara munich. The recipe stipulates a double decoction and makes a particular point that the decoction is very important. However, I have seen a very similar recipe that uses only a multi-rest infusion mash.

Cheers - Snow.
 
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Andrew Clark

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Snow,
I think you will find that decoction mashing is a thing of the past, the same applies to step infusion mashing these were used for malts with very low diastatic power where a protien rest was required for proper conversion. I still use a double step infusion mash for my wit beer but that recipe uses alot of wheat malt and in particular UNMALTED wheat.
I would suspect that for the grain bill you are using the decoction is for color and and hightened malt flavor and not for improving the diastatic power of the malts themselves.
I would follow the instructions in the recipe and you will be suprised at the malt aroma you will achieve.
Regards
Andrew
 

Snow

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Well,

I gave the double decoction mash a go last night. Shite it took ages...15 mins @ 54C, decoction for 15 mins @ 72C, Boil for 20 mins, back into mash for 20 mins @ 64C, decoction boil again for 20 mins, back into mash for 20 mins @ 74C, sparge..... it bloody well took me 3 hours from go to whoa and I haven't even done the boil yet - that comes tonight! I tell you what, unless this the best beer I've ever tasted, it will be my last decoction mash! Still - at least I can say I've done one now....

- Snow
 
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Jovial_Monk

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Decoctions are not strictly necessary, but they do add a lot of taste--maltyness and bready-grainy taste--and increase extract. OTOH, they increase the lenght of the brewday.

Mash in at 50C, leave for 20 mins. Scoop out 1/3 of the mash, quite thick, i.e. lots of grains. Raise this portion to sach temp and hold 15 mins, then bring slowly to boiling and boil for 15 minutes (some recipes may suggest different times) add this to your main mash and stir through.

Still worth doing for many lager malts, IMHO

Jovial Monk
 

Murray

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Snow said:
Well,

I gave the double decoction mash a go last night. Shite it took ages...15 mins @ 54C, decoction for 15 mins @ 72C, Boil for 20 mins, back into mash for 20 mins @ 64C, decoction boil again for 20 mins, back into mash for 20 mins @ 74C, sparge..... it bloody well took me 3 hours from go to whoa and I haven't even done the boil yet - that comes tonight! I tell you what, unless this the best beer I've ever tasted, it will be my last decoction mash! Still - at least I can say I've done one now....

- Snow
Yes, it is more time consuming than it looks on paper.
 

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