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Corny keg carbonation

Discussion in 'General Brewing Techniques' started by Beak, 14/4/15.

 

  1. Beak

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    Posted 14/4/15
    Gday all just wondering which way most people carb their kegs? We have found setting the pressure to 30 psi for 48hrs sufficent. And sending the gas down the liquid out tube. Now I heard a way, from a bloke at a brew/keg shop that u can just set the pour pressure and leave it to sit for a week. And it's carbed. Is this true? Love to hear your thoughts!
     
  2. whitegoose

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    Posted 14/4/15
    Yep, 1-2 weeks at pouring pressure will do it
     
  3. ben-burd

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    Posted 14/4/15
    I have just started kegging and I wanted the easiest foolproof way. I set mine to 10-12 psi and its good to go a week later
     
  4. Dunkelbrau

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    Posted 14/4/15
    Pouring pressure in my opinion is better, never over carbed. I like beers on the lower end so I'd prefer to not get it too high.

    If the beer is cold going in, 24 hours on gas is enough
     
  5. Blind Dog

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    Posted 14/4/15
    Best for me is at serving pressure for 7 to 10 days

    Quickest is the Ross method, but I find this results in bigger bubbles and thus a shorter lasting and less creamy head and it makes my English beers too gassy.

    YMMV
     
  6. Eagleburger

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    Posted 14/4/15
    Two weeks at serving pressure. I have found one is not enough.
     
    2 people like this.
  7. Chris7

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    Posted 14/4/15
    +1
     
  8. Grott

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    Posted 14/4/15
    Has anyone tried the "rock and roll" method at serving pressure? Understand this takes about 30 minutes.
    Cheers
     
  9. pcmfisher

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    Posted 15/4/15
    And what's more you don't even have to do that. 30 for 48 works just as well through the gas post.
     
  10. Beak

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    Posted 15/4/15
    Thanks everyone for there feedback! We will defently have to try the pouring pressure carb up! But as I'm always thirsty after work, may have to rush the brew done to two days! Arrr but I forgot we let settle for another two days at pouring pressure before tasting. 7-4 days it's hard a choice!
     
  11. dannymars

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    Posted 15/4/15
    2mins rocking at 40psi down liquid post.... Then turn bottle off (leave regulator on)... Keep rocking until the gauge on the reg reaches serving pressure...
    UNPLUG GAS FROM LIQUID POST (very important)
    Turn off reg,
    Then purge keg, plug the gas back in gas post... Turn on gas bottle and reg... Then wait a few hours and it's pretty much ready...
    Yeah the bubbles will be bigger, but you want a beer right?
    The big bubbles will reduce day by day.
     
  12. thebigwilk

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    Posted 15/4/15
    usually pulling the first beer after 10 mins after kegging that is of course after cold crashing the fermenter down to 3c for a couple of days. Once in

    the keg set the reg to about 35 psi and rock the keg back and forth in a pretty quick motion for about 1 min give or take, then let it sit for 10 mins to

    let the foam settle in the keg then release keg pressure down to 7 to 10 and pull a beer. if it needs a bit more repeat the process but rock for less

    time. you will get the hang of it after you have done a few.

    cheers!
     
  13. The Village Idiot

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    Posted 15/4/15
    Cold beer - 24 hours @ 300 kpa is bloody close. I then bleed pressure and set at 90 ish and enjoy. Warm beer about 30 hours.
     
  14. Ciderman

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    Posted 10/5/15
    I'm new to kegs and I just can't get it right. I have a home made keezer, 4 tap font, perlick 650ss, aprox 1-1.2m 5mm beer line. I force carbed by first beer and it was perfect, second beer over carbed. Luckily the flow control allowed me to pour but still wasn't quite right as you can imagine.

    3rd beer I tried the set and forget method and after 3 weeks it just doesn't feel carbonated enough. I started on about 10-12 PSI for two weeks and bumped it up to 14 for the last week. Temperatures stay between 3-5 degrees Celsius.

    Just tastes like English bitter/ stout kind of carbonation levels. Im reasonably sure I don't have a leak. Am I doing something wrong?
     
  15. Kingy

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    Posted 10/5/15
    That sounds like a regulator issue. At 14psi it should be noticibly carbed up.
     
  16. Ciderman

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    Posted 10/5/15
    Yeah maybe your onto something. It was purchased second hand and I've never cleaned it.
     
  17. Ciderman

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    Posted 11/5/15
    It wasn't too bad, tiny bit of dried beer or something in there. Gave it a good clean. Hard to believe a little bit of gunk was causing an issue but let's see if it's fixed!
     
  18. Grott

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    Posted 11/5/15
    I use 9.5 litre kegs and until I get some more kegs I force carb as there is nothing worse than needing a keg but there is still days to go with the at pouring pressure method. I have found that a slight change to the Ross method is spot on for me:- keg cooled to 3.5/4 degrees, 30psi through the gas post, rolling the keg back and forth with the gas post at the bottom for 50 seconds (stop watch). Gas off at bottle, continue rocking until pressure goes just below 20 psi, turn gas on and straight off again. The pressure is at 30psi, rock down to 20 psi again. Disconnect gas, keg in fridge to settle. When wanted release gas from keg, connect gas at pouring pressure and away you go. Have found this works every time.
    Cheers
     
  19. jaywalkar

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    Posted 23/5/15
    Like all things in brewing, it's best to have patience. I only just got my kegerator set up and have no intention on trying to speed up the carbonation process. Just set it to 10 - 12 psi and let it carbonate the way it is supposed to.
     
  20. Moad

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    Posted 23/5/15
    Most beers will improve (and clear) over the 2 weeks it takes to carb up if set to serving pressure, in an ideal world we would all have enough space and a pipeline of beers to let them all carb up and condition for 2 weeks.

    I have space but never seem to have the beer so I set mine to 40psi for 48 hours (already cold when hooked up on the gas).

    I bleed it then hook it up to a serving line (I have two regulators, one for carbing and one for serving) and it is 9/10 times good to go. I also gelatine when I keg which speeds up the yeast dropping out.

    If I have a big enough pipeline I turn my "carbing" reg back to serving and just have two sitting there ready to swap over but this rarely happens.
     

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