Coopers (Lager) Yeast

Australia & New Zealand Homebrewing Forum

Help Support Australia & New Zealand Homebrewing Forum:

livo

Well-Known Member
Joined
3/10/11
Messages
102
Reaction score
16
I've found this relating to carbonating Lager, (thanks to MHB again)

"Allow the beer to warm back up and like temporary haze will promptly go back into solution - undoing all you have achieved by lagering.
Best to rack the beer to a priming bucket Cold (leaving all the precipitated matter in the primary) with the right amount of sugar mix well and bottle. If you are worried about the amount of yeast in solution you could add a bit of a nice clean yeast to the priming bucket (rehydrate it first) only a gram or two would be enough for a 23L batch"


So this is the plan. Bottling bucket, bulk prime and add 1 gram of hydrated new lager yeast, bottle and sit for a few weeks back in the temp controlled fridge at 13.5'C. Then I'll chill a couple and see how it went.

The SG has dropped right down to 1.002 yesterday and it is a very clean, clear and crisp beer already so I'm hoping for a success with this. A lot of time and fridge space over quite a few weeks now. I think I'll wait for winter before doing it again.
 

Jolls

Well-Known Member
Joined
28/3/20
Messages
53
Reaction score
16
Thanks for the commentry Livo - been following your adventure. My beer ofter next will be a lager in a keg; an early 20th Century Dinner Ale.

Cheers

jolls
 

livo

Well-Known Member
Joined
3/10/11
Messages
102
Reaction score
16
It's been a lot more than I expected it to involve and a far cry from just using lager yeast and fermenting cold. It's now around 24 days since I started this brew. Cold ferment, diacetyl rest, slow temp drop over several days and a week or so at 2'C, then into a bottling bucket, bulk primed with additional yeast and bottled cold. I'm not certain of the effectiveness of my process to this point of having bottles conditioning, and I still have questions.

What temperature should I have the bottles for carbonation / conditioning? For how long?
After rehydrating bottling yeast, what about temperature shock from adding it to the bottling bucket at 2'C?
How would you go about harvesting the yeast from the primary?

I guess I'll find out in a couple of weeks if it worked or not.
 

livo

Well-Known Member
Joined
3/10/11
Messages
102
Reaction score
16
Today marks 1 month since I put this brew together (got my dates mixed up). After priming and bottling at low temperature I returned the bottles to the fridge and allowed the temp to come up over a few days and then they have sat out in ambient for a few more days to carbonate. I put a couple in the fridge 48 hours ago and just cracked one. The process has worked and I don't have any "off" flavours, but I'm a bit disappointed in the end result and it probably comes down to using the Cooper's Lager extract kit. I've said before that it is a bitter beer and this has really come through. I used to drink bitter beer all the time so it won't go to waste but it wasn't worth the effort and time, although I've learnt a lot in the process. Maybe it will mellow from some further lagering.

I guess I'll wait for colder months to use up my other lager yeasts and I'll need to find a more suitable base. Wouldn't you think an extract labelled Lager would be a satisfactory choice to make? Any suggestions?
 
Last edited:

Reveirs

New Member
Joined
29/3/20
Messages
4
Reaction score
5
Today marks 2 months since I put this brew together. After priming and bottling at low temperature I returned the bottles to the fridge and allowed the temp to come up over a few days and then they have sat out in ambient for a few more days to carbonate. I put a couple in the fridge 48 hours ago and just cracked one. The process has worked and I don't have any "off" flavours, but I'm a bit disappointed in the end result and it probably comes down to using the Cooper's Lager extract kit. I've said before that it is a bitter beer and this has really come through. I used to drink bitter beer all the time so it won't go to waste but it wasn't worth the effort and time, although I've learnt a lot in the process. Maybe it will mellow from some further lagering.

I guess I'll wait for colder months to use up my other lager yeasts and I'll need to find a more suitable base. Wouldn't you think an extract labelled Lager would be a satisfactory choice to make? Any suggestions?

I would use unhopped extract and 20grams of noble hops for a classic German lager flavour.
 

livo

Well-Known Member
Joined
3/10/11
Messages
102
Reaction score
16
Thanks Reveirs. What would be the process? Kit extracts require no boil. Dry hopping / steeping grains etc as processes are understood but I haven't bothered at this early stage of my renewed interest in the hobby. Would the use of unhopped extract and noble hops involve a boil, hopping and cooling to achieve the fermentable wort? I'm not perturbed by the prospect as I've done AG in the past, but I'm not sure it's where I want to head right now.

However, within a few months when the winter is here and lager is a better prospect, I may just go and have a crack.
 
Joined
16/2/12
Messages
949
Reaction score
328
Ready to bottle this over the weekend. I would appreciate a little advice as I've not ever done this style of beer before. I can use a bottling bucket and bulk prime.
Question 1) Should I bottle this cold, straight from the lagering fridge or warm it up a bit to room temperature overnight?
Question 2) Is additional priming yeast required or not, and how much if it is?
The beer will warm as you proceed. Then you can finish raising it to carbonating temps. Slower is better.

For what it's worth, I've bottled and carbonated Oktoberfests that had been lagered below six degrees for well over a month, in one case >rwo months. No priming yeast. At about 20 degrees, all clouded in the bottle and then cleared within a week. At ten days a test bottle was carbonated, so I brought the rest back down for more lagering and liked the results. So did tasters.

Cautions. In each case the yeast was S-189. Other yeasts may respond differently.. Many experienced brewers recommend priming yeast, and I've seen one or two accounts where brewers regretted not doing so.

To sum up: you'd very likely have success without priming yeast, but priming yeast would guarantee success.
 
Last edited:

livo

Well-Known Member
Joined
3/10/11
Messages
102
Reaction score
16
Thanks yanks. All good. I went with very low level priming yeast and it has carbonated well. I now have them all in the fridge and they are getting better by the day. I'm only allowing myself 1 longy a day, but even at that rate they won't last long enough to really sit at low temp for long time. If some of my other brews kick in early, they may last a little longer. I should be able to stretch a few out to see what I really have achieved, (but I do get thirsty sometimes).

Winter will be a better prospect now that I know what to expect.
 

Latest posts

Top