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MashPaddler

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Getting close to finishing the cider press, attached is the pic of the main juicing box we joined up today, after cutting, gluing, biscuiting and sanding each side. I found a setup on the net using a machine press or shop press, which is basically a bottlejack in a heavy metal frame, with a box and boards for pressing crushed apple cheeses. We built the box in the pic from blackbutt and other recycled hardwoods, along with some timber boards to put within the apple cheeses. Just need to run a router across the press boards, sand and oil and she's done. Will post some pics of the final unit mounted in the press soon. From other presses I have seen, she should press around 3 gallons per press.

IMG_0286.jpg
 

hoppy2B

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Will oiling the wood cause oil to get into your juice?
 

punkin

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I'm not sure what i'm looking at here?
Are you planning to put the pulp in the box and press?

Seems to me the box will just explode if you do. Normally with that type of press the cheeses are not confined and it allows them to flatten and spread.
 

431neb

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punkin said:
I'm not sure what i'm looking at here?
Are you planning to put the pulp in the box and press?

Seems to me the box will just explode if you do. Normally with that type of press the cheeses are not confined and it allows them to flatten and spread.
x 2
 

MashPaddler

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Sorry for the delay in responding. It is a hybrid of a the wine press cider press if you like. Pulp goes into muslin cheese cloths 'apple cheeses', placed on boards we made out of strips of the blackbutt with channels cut with a router that hold the cheeses in place and channel the juice to the ends rather than the sides. Initial run went fine, the sides helped catch the juice splash on initial pressure which given the size of the machine press would have spilt over as the height to width ratio would have meant a very short and small press without the sides.

I didn't overload the cheeses, and the system seems to work fine. If you were just whacking the pulp in there and pressing, I agree explosion could occur. The blackbutt is super hard wood, and we did the biscuit joinery so the box is rock solid. A successful autumn project and all geared up for the next cider season for under $200 including the machine press. I'll load up a couple more pics of the final system shortly.
 

MashPaddler

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Re the oiling, it is just a light coating of olive oil after the pressing session for winter storage which the wood soaks up. Just for longevity of the timber and no harsh solvents or toxic products. Tip I picked up from google research a while back.
 

MashPaddler

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finally getting the hang of posting pictures. Here's some of the cider press completed

cider press.jpg


apple cheese board.jpg
 

Anthony.R.M

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...and the million dollar question is, have you pressed any apples yet and what were the results?
 

Greg.L

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It looks very well built. Are you taking orders for the racks (cheeseboards)? I would order a set of 6 no worries. You don't really need the box but I can see it would be useful for containing the pulp. My layers sometimes end up slipping to the side, specially with slippery pears.
 

MashPaddler

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Greg.L said:
It looks very well built. Are you taking orders for the racks (cheeseboards)? I would order a set of 6 no worries. You don't really need the box but I can see it would be useful for containing the pulp. My layers sometimes end up slipping to the side, specially with slippery pears.
Thanks!

That's why we did the routing on the boards, the layers dig in rather than slip - good to know re the pears, we intend to do a couple of batches of perry next year.

Appreciate the opportunity, but the boards took about 4 hours each from cutting the slats, biscuiting, routing and sanding, so probably not commercially viable.
 

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