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Chinook hop trimming

Discussion in 'Hops' started by Peter can box, 24/9/19.

 

  1. Peter can box

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    Posted 24/9/19
    Hi guys I planted a chinook rhizome and it has one main shoot that’s shot up to about 35cm and now another smaller shoot has popped up. Should I cut the 35cm shoot off- someone told me this will make it send up more fresh shoots.
    I am in Perth. We have quite warm sunny weather already now. IMG_1188.JPG 59072045061__7563A3B7-15C1-4A32-984E-890F6C6A66E8.JPG
     
  2. DJR

    I'm out

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    Posted 24/9/19
  3. hoppy2B

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    Posted 24/9/19
    I wouldn't cut anything off a newly planted rhizome just to be safe. Train as many bines up string as you can in the first season.

    I think it is recommended to cut back the early bines in established hop yards to create an even emergence of bines. It's not really necessary to do that in a small backyard type scenario.
     
  4. Peter can box

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    Posted 26/9/19
    Cheers fellas for the replies
     
  5. Belgrave Brewer

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    Posted 27/9/19
    Train 3 bines per string and let the rest grow on the ground first year for root development.
     

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