Quantcast

Can't Decide on Pot Size for BIAB

Aussie Home Brewer

Help Support Aussie Home Brewer:

Blazar

Well-Known Member
Joined
26/8/12
Messages
57
Reaction score
4
[SIZE=medium]G’day,[/SIZE]

[SIZE=medium]I’ve been a kits and bits man for the last 14 months, and am now looking to move to BIAB. What I can’t seem to decide on is which size pot to get as this will also determine the method I use (I think!)[/SIZE]

  • [SIZE=medium]Do I go for the 19L Big W pot for $20 and make a more concentrated wort that can be diluted down to 23L batch size, or;[/SIZE]
  • [SIZE=medium]Do I go the 40L aluminium pot for $90 and do a full batch from the get go?[/SIZE]

[SIZE=medium]Obviously the price difference is very attractive, but is there more “stuffing around” doing the smaller size then topping up, or should I just buy-once-cry-once and go the 40L[/SIZE]


[SIZE=11pt]HELP!![/SIZE]
 

QldKev

Brew Dude
Joined
21/6/05
Messages
7,471
Reaction score
1,031
Location
Bundy
For 23L I would not worry about a 19L pot, I would go the bigger full volume. I would try and source a secondhand 50L keg, you should be able to get one for less that $90 and it will be a s/s pot that will last you may years. IMHO 50L is also a better size than 40L for the pot.
 

Blazar

Well-Known Member
Joined
26/8/12
Messages
57
Reaction score
4
Cheers Kev thanks for that, I am leaning towards full volume purely because I'd know straight up how much water I'd need from the get go and that's it.
 

meathead

Well-Known Member
Joined
4/1/13
Messages
433
Reaction score
106
Location
Brighton, Vic
I've got a 38litre pot and wish I had a 50
The bigger pot decreases the risk of spills especially when the grain bill is large
 

wbosher

Well-Known Member
Joined
20/8/12
Messages
1,331
Reaction score
130
What QldKev said, 50L all the way. It's the perfect size for doing up to 25L batches, and will last a very long time until you feel like upgrading.
 

fletcher

bibo ergo sum
Joined
19/8/12
Messages
1,824
Reaction score
632
if i had my time again, i'd go bigger. i started with 19L, now am using a 38L and still want to go higher for fuller batches (23L). i make do easily but having more would be so much easier and mean less dicking around. i agree that 50L is the way to go
 

angus_grant

Custom Title Now Available
Joined
25/10/11
Messages
1,593
Reaction score
635
Location
southsideFoLyfe, Brisbane
50L is a good size for single-batch BIABs, and would also be an OK size mash tun if you ever move to 2V or 3V brewing. I don't think 50L mash tun would get you double-batches, but you could start doing multiple brews on the same day for not much more time than a single brew.

I've done a BIAB with 8.5 kgs of grain in my 50L pot and that was pretty close to full during the mash.
 

nu_brew

Well-Known Member
Joined
16/2/12
Messages
255
Reaction score
61
50litres is very good. Though I wish I'd gone 70.
 

Blazar

Well-Known Member
Joined
26/8/12
Messages
57
Reaction score
4
Thanks very much everyone, 50ltr it is, can pick up an aluminium pot with lid for $100 brand new which is what I'll be getting this afternoon.

Kits 'n' Bits has been fun but now time to jump the fence!!
 

contrarian

Well-Known Member
Joined
7/1/13
Messages
3,123
Reaction score
1,387
For an extra $50 you can get a stainless steel 70L pot which is perfect for double batches. It's great being able to knock out 45L of wort in not much longer than it takes for a single batch. Well, that's what I thought and it has served me well so far!
 

Kingy

Well-Known Member
Joined
21/10/06
Messages
1,627
Reaction score
551
Location
Maryland, Newcastle,New South Wales, Australia, Ea
For an extra $50 you can get a stainless steel 70L pot which is perfect for double batches. It's great being able to knock out 45L of wort in not much longer than it takes for a single batch. Well, that's what I thought and it has served me well so far!

Yeah I'm glad I brought an 80litre ally pot. Felt to big for the first couple of years but now I'm double batching it's gold. Same amount of work but double the amount of product. It's great having a few labelled no chill cubes full and deciding which one to ferment :)
 

Keppmiestet

Member
Joined
18/11/13
Messages
20
Reaction score
0
I have a 60L pot for BIAB which is a great size for single batch 20L brews , plenty of room to prevent any overflows even with big grain bills of 10 kgs. Push the limits doing double batches tho, looking to get a 100L stainless pot soon so I can make my fav brews in bulk.
 

hoppy2B

Well-Known Member
Joined
31/7/11
Messages
1,642
Reaction score
175
Its not just the pot, its everything that goes with it that you need to consider. For example, a large pot requires a suitable burner and stand etc.
Then you need a suitable sky hook to lift the bag when you BIAB.
 

Keppmiestet

Member
Joined
18/11/13
Messages
20
Reaction score
0
Yeah there is a limit to how far you could with size with BIAB, I have a good solid stand that has been reinforced and a nasa burner also an engine crane in my garage that I use to suspend the bag of grain to drain off cause that gets real heavy quick doing it by hand. I feel the weakest link is the bag. I wonder what it's max limit in weight would be ? 20kg maybe .
 

Donske

...
Joined
7/3/13
Messages
794
Reaction score
236
Keppmiestet said:
Yeah there is a limit to how far you could with size with BIAB, I have a good solid stand that has been reinforced and a nasa burner also an engine crane in my garage that I use to suspend the bag of grain to drain off cause that gets real heavy quick doing it by hand. I feel the weakest link is the bag. I wonder what it's max limit in weight would be ? 20kg maybe .
I've had a bit over 12kg of grain in the craft brewer bag, with how slow they drain I'm sure it was more like 35-40kg when first lifting, handled it fine, didn't even get the sense it was too much weight.
 

mxd

Well-Known Member
Joined
26/10/09
Messages
2,434
Reaction score
212
angus_grant said:
I don't think 50L mash tun would get you double-batches,
I used to do tripples (12 to 15 kg of grist and then fill it up) with my 50 ltr keg MLT, it generally meant there were 2 or 3 batch sparges required.
 

Spiesy

Illmatic
Joined
28/12/11
Messages
3,274
Reaction score
1,124
Location
Melbourne
contrarian said:
For an extra $50 you can get a stainless steel 70L pot which is perfect for double batches. It's great being able to knock out 45L of wort in not much longer than it takes for a single batch. Well, that's what I thought and it has served me well so far!
Bang. Spot on. I do single batches, 95% of the time - but I love my 70l ss pot from CraftBrewer. I have the ability to do double batches when I need, which is perfect for brewing with mates, and no issues at all with a single batch. To be honest, with some high gravity, 90-min boil single batches, I'm also glad I have the 70.
 

Spiesy

Illmatic
Joined
28/12/11
Messages
3,274
Reaction score
1,124
Location
Melbourne
hoppy2B said:
Its not just the pot, its everything that goes with it that you need to consider. For example, a large pot requires a suitable burner and stand etc.
Then you need a suitable sky hook to lift the bag when you BIAB.
For big single batches you'll generally be able to lift it yourself - unless basic strength is something you struggle with.

I lift it out and let it drain in a clothes basket (with perforated bottom) that sits in a SCA tub. Light work.
 

Spiesy

Illmatic
Joined
28/12/11
Messages
3,274
Reaction score
1,124
Location
Melbourne
mxd said:
I used to do tripples (12 to 15 kg of grist and then fill it up) with my 50 ltr keg MLT, it generally meant there were 2 or 3 batch sparges required.
12-15kg for a tripple? Did you have a super-high efficiency, make small batches or make mid to low gravity wort?
 

MashPaddler

Well-Known Member
Joined
28/4/13
Messages
144
Reaction score
24
Location
Canberra
A 40L urn is a tried and true step up from kits as a starting point, electric, concealed element, easy and cheap way to move up. As Hoppy2B said, you will also need a gas burner or be comfortable drilling holes in the pot for electric elements (bad drilling = buggered pot) , ball valves etc so which ever way you go, make sure you know all the costs involved.
 

Latest posts

Top