Can the Coopers Porter HME sub for their Stout?

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nbilling

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I'm just starting out in extract brewing and I wanted to try making a simple stout recipe (O'Leary Stout, from Customize Your Coopers) for my first brewing attempt. However stock of Coopers is not good where I am, right now, so the closest to the Coopers stout I could find is Coopers Devil's Half porter.

Is that close enough to just substitute, or should I make any adjustments to the recipe to account for the different base HME? I'd rather not make hop additions or a partial mash since this is my first try and I want to make sure my most basic procedures are correct first in case anything goes wrong. Thanks!
 

kadmium

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I would substitute it no worries. Then, you can substitute the Light Dry Malt Extract (LDME) 50:50 with some Dark DME.

What yeast are you going to pitch?
 

nbilling

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I would substitute it no worries. Then, you can substitute the Light Dry Malt Extract (LDME) 50:50 with some Dark DME.

What yeast are you going to pitch?
I was just going to use the one that comes with the can, but if you have a better suggestion I'd love to know. I don't know yeasts, but I figure as long as it doesn't require a special technique to use then I'm happy to try a different yeast.
 

kadmium

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Not sure what yeast comes with the coopers kits, but a safe cheap investment would be a good quality dry yeast. If yeasts are a bit thin on variety where you are, classic US-05 would be fine. Otherwise Danstar Nottingham if you can get it. Both are fairly neutral yeasts which should give a healthy ferment.

They are not complicated to use. Sanitise the outside by dipping in your sanitiser solution (including scisors) and cut open packet. Sprinkle on top and obsess over beer making for the next 40 years.

Yeast makes beer, the packet that comes with who knows how old it is, how it was kept etc. Just my opinion. Should only costs sub $6 for good dry yeast.
 

nbilling

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Thanks! Yeast variety should be fine, there are several good homebrew stores nearby I'm told, they just don't carry Coopers stuff. So I have to order from the local (USA) version of the Coopers website, and that has very low stock right now.

I called them and they reckon there's unprecedented demand since everyone's been stuck at home this year.
 

Grmblz

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Join Coopers club (free, and you get club discounts on all purchases) they're currently running their monthly free shipping on orders over $80 (till Sept13th)
You now have access to their full range at much better prices than your LHBS, and it's as fresh as you're going to get (very important for liquid extract, not so much for dried) and check their recipes section.
The extract and yeast is brand new (not been sitting on a shelf somewhere) Coopers actually supply different yeasts depending on the can you buy (all the info on their FAQs') and in my experience is just as good if not better than after market yeasts (will almost certainly be fresher)
With a bit of planning it's not hard to get to $80, maybe decide on 2 or 3 beers that you want to make, and get all the ingredients.
For dried yeast Cheap Yeast Store reliable, cheap, and high turnover so less chance of getting stale product (have to buy 7 packets but stores in fridge/freezer for a year or more)
 

kadmium

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Join Coopers club (free, and you get club discounts on all purchases) they're currently running their monthly free shipping on orders over $80 (till Sept13th)
You now have access to their full range at much better prices than your LHBS, and it's as fresh as you're going to get (very important for liquid extract, not so much for dried) and check their recipes section.
The extract and yeast is brand new (not been sitting on a shelf somewhere) Coopers actually supply different yeasts depending on the can you buy (all the info on their FAQs') and in my experience is just as good if not better than after market yeasts (will almost certainly be fresher)
With a bit of planning it's not hard to get to $80, maybe decide on 2 or 3 beers that you want to make, and get all the ingredients.
For dried yeast Cheap Yeast Store reliable, cheap, and high turnover so less chance of getting stale product (have to buy 7 packets but stores in fridge/freezer for a year or more)
I think he said USA? So perhaps that's out? Could be mistaken.

I think it will be a good beer and tasty.
 

nbilling

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Correct I'm living in the USA.

I did ask the Coopers US store people about the Coopers Club discount and they told me it doesn't apply to the US store and you cannot sign into your forums account on the US store, etc.. It seems a bit like the people who run the US store are more focused on the Mr. Beer line of products, which are still made at the same facility in SA but are sold on a different online storefront and offer different styles.

I wish I could pay 80AUD and get free shipping hehe. The cans on the US site are significantly more expensive, not even taking exchange rate into account, and you have to pay for shipping no matter how much you order. Still worth it to me though, I'm glad I can get them at all. Many things from Australia I cannot get here from any retailer, like musk essence and double cream.

About the yeast: if I want to give the one that comes with the can a try, because as Grmblz said I want to see how Coopers intended the beer to be innoculated, should I put yeast nutrient or something to ensure that it ferments well, even if the yeast happens to not be fresh? Is it not worth the risk if I can't verify that it's fresh?
 

Grmblz

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That's strange, I posted before his last post so didn't see it, hope I haven't ruined his day, bit like us drooling over stuff available in the US For $500 then finding it's $2000 here, i really want a spike uni but it's too big for carry-on. 😭
 

nbilling

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Yeah sorry all my posts have to be approved by an admin because I just joined (presumably), but once approved they appear with the original timestamp from when i posted them.
 

Grmblz

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@nbilling theoretically nutrient shouldn't be needed but a 1/4 tea spoon of a balanced nutrient blend (not DAP) wont hurt and in all probability is quite a good idea, if you have difficulty sourcing it, a reasonable solution is to boil a teaspoon of bakers yeast (fresh or dried) for 15min's in a couple cups of water, and add that.
Sorry for the previous advice, didn't realise you were in the US.
Have a quick look at this for one mans take on it. What are yeast nutrients and how are they used? - Brew Your Own
 

hoppy2B

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Hi nbilling,

Have you read John Palmer's online book 'How to Brew'? A lot of the good tips in it on how to make great beer.

As far as yeast is concerned, I think the Coopers kit yeast is pretty good, and I quite like the esters it produces. It should be sufficient for the task you wish to use it for. In future, should you wish to start adding hops, a good alternative might be something like the new Verdant dry yeast that came out recently.
 

kadmium

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Hi nbilling,

Have you read John Palmer's online book 'How to Brew'? A lot of the good tips in it on how to make great beer.

As far as yeast is concerned, I think the Coopers kit yeast is pretty good, and I quite like the esters it produces. It should be sufficient for the task you wish to use it for. In future, should you wish to start adding hops, a good alternative might be something like the new Verdant dry yeast that came out recently.
The verdant yeast is a particular yeast descendant from London Ale III and presents with apricot / milk bottle notes. Far from what I would associate with a stout or porter. It's also low floculating.
 

hoppy2B

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The verdant yeast is a particular yeast descendant from London Ale III and presents with apricot / milk bottle notes. Far from what I would associate with a stout or porter. It's also low floculating.
I wasn't suggesting nbilling use it for a stout or porter. I made a reference to adding hops. TBH it probably could be used for the above brews. London Ale III is an awesome yeast. I'm assuming Verdant is a good dry alternative. The reviews I've read have been positive. I've not seen it described as milk bottle notes anywhere. But hey, even that would work in a stout. Seems you're just being a negative twatt kadmium.
 

kadmium

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I wasn't suggesting nbilling use it for a stout or porter. I made a reference to adding hops. TBH it probably could be used for the above brews. London Ale III is an awesome yeast. I'm assuming Verdant is a good dry alternative. The reviews I've read have been positive. I've not seen it described as milk bottle notes anywhere. But hey, even that would work in a stout. Seems you're just being a negative twatt kadmium.
Not sure why you need to result to name calling. Thought this was a forum for adults, didn't realise toddlers had access to it.

If you don't agree with a point I make, disagree with the point. Making it personal or resorting to name calling serves nothing. It only highlights how insecure you must be if you can't handle opposing points of view to your own.

Perhaps explore the world a little, expand your horizons, and maybe don't suggest someone new to brewing who is doing a stout extract kit use NEIPA specific yeast that's low flocculation on their new journey into brewing. Or perhaps you're just an ignorant toddler who has a tasty and resort's to name calling when you don't have your morning nap.
 

kadmium

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Agreed. I probably responded inappropriately but was no need to begin in the first place.

Back to topic, let us know how you go with the substitution on the kit. Be interested to know your thoughts!
 

nbilling

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Thanks everyone for all the advice and for the How to Brew Beer recommendation. I'll update the thread when I have some feedback on the Stout, which I guess will be quite a while. My plan is to bottle it fairly soon after it's fermented but then age in the bottles for some time before I start drinking them in earnest. That way I can crack a bottle every few weeks to see when it's ready.
 

kadmium

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Sounds good mate! I'm sure it will be great!
 

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