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Can i re-prime flat bottles?

Discussion in 'General Brewing Techniques' started by Nick Masters, 28/7/18.

 

  1. Nick Masters

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    Posted 28/7/18
    I put down a brew and after 2 months in the bottles is still flat. Can I open them and add more priming sugar and re cap them?
     
  2. koshari

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    Posted 28/7/18
    If they are in pet bottles you could force carb b4 drinking. Otherwise your running the gauntlet a bit with infection. You may want to pasturise a dextrose syrup and try that.

    They will also need to be stored at a temp whete the yeast can reactive.
     
    Last edited: 28/7/18
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  3. Nick Masters

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    Posted 28/7/18
    Thanks for that. Glass stubbies. How do I pasturise a dextrose syrup?
     
  4. koshari

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    Posted 28/7/18
    Just make a slurry with boiling water.

    You will of course have to pour a bit of beer out to accommodate the slurry.

    Would pay to note the gravity of the beer as well.
     
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  5. philrob

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    Posted 29/7/18
    I don't think it's a shortage of fermentables, rather inactive yeast. Yes, you can add more yeast, just use a tiny bit of dry yeast per bottle.
     
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  6. peterlonz

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    Posted 29/7/18
    This has very occasionally happened to me.
    Since the priming "sugar/dextrose" is still present as fermentable material you need only reactivate the yeast.
    I found the simplest method was to add a few "grains" of dried yeast. On both occasions I used the standard Coopers yeast because I know it to be very reliable. Then just make sure you shake & place in a suitable warm spot best between 22 & 25 C.
    This worked for me, no infection, no removing liquid from bottle!!
     
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  7. Nick Masters

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    Posted 29/7/18
    Thanks heaps
    Once I have added the yeast how long would I need to leave them before drinking?
    Cheers
     
  8. Clevohead

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    Posted 30/7/18
    I think you need to look at why you have flat beer? And prevent the cause not try and fix it after the fact. Bit on our operation: there are three of us that bottle on a Wednesday night, a brew each of the tinned kits, Coopers, Mangrove Jacks, Black Rock etc... We clean and bottle approx 90 long necks a night.

    We had similar issues a while back, and we found two issues contributing to our problems:

    1. Bottles would occasionally be flat and occasionally explode, this was due to either being missed (flat) during priming or double sugared (exploding). We moved to batch priming our wort prior to bottling. This just involves taking a measured amount of sugar and mixing with enough hot water to make a syrup/slurry, and pouring into wort just prior to bottling with a little swirl of the spoon, no need to sugar individual bottles, you can then do a combination of stubbies and long necks etc... with all bottles getting their share of the prime.

    2. We were still getting the occasional flat, over the next month or two of batches this started increasing, we bottle in long necks a combination of twist and crown pop tops. After some investigating and testing we established "Warwick" our capper after 30 years of use between two different brew groups had worn on the capping head not sealing the bottle 100% this was more an issue on the twist tops than the pop tops. Our mate's old man had another capper that he no longer used we done several brews with it virtually eliminating all issues of flat beers.

    Our only bottle issues since have been a couple explode, and a couple infected, we have now started out in giving all our bottles a good over haul and quarantining any that aren't cleaning up as they should, with approx 2,000 long necks in circulation between the three of us it will take a little while to get through them all with only 90 getting bottled each Wednesday night, and less now I have moved over to kegging.

    Hope this helps and gives and gives you a couple of things to look at, and if you want any other pointers etc... please feel free to shout out.
     

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