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Burton Ale Yeast, Suggest Some Recipes?

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Byran

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Gday Boys, and girls.

I Just went to my local( Home brew supplies) and purchased a white labs Burton Ale liquid yeast.
Im gonna do an English mild and wondered if anyone had a good english style recipe that they might like to post for me to build mine from.

I was thinking 23 litre batch

4kg Pale malt
0.5 Wheat
0.5 Caramunich 1
Single infusion medium body
Willamette 1st wort addition only
Usual adjuncts

Comments?
 

fcmcg

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Gday Boys, and girls.

I Just went to my local( Home brew supplies) and purchased a white labs Burton Ale liquid yeast.
Im gonna do an English mild and wondered if anyone had a good english style recipe that they might like to post for me to build mine from.

I was thinking 23 litre batch

4kg Pale malt
0.5 Wheat
0.5 Caramunich 1
Single infusion medium body
Willamette 1st wort addition only
Usual adjuncts

Comments?
Westgate brewers just had a mild competition....
MO as a base , simpsons medium crystal and some simpsons choc malt...set recipe competition...
All the judges said that they needed some malt complexity....so i'd keep the munich....however i think you need some other grains , IMHO
I'd ditch the wheat....I also made some invert sugar in my kettle and sparged onto that...
Hops look good....the key to a good mild is not too much hops...so a 60 in addition is plenty and keep the IBU's between 10 and 25
Mines on tap at the moment...i'm enjoying it but it is a hard beer to brew....light in alc
OH...i mashed at 68....
Cheers
Ferg
 

emnpaul

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Best kit beer I ever made was a Golden Ale with Burton ale yeast.

1.7Kg Cooper's CAnadian Blonde
1.0Kg LDME
250g Dextrose
20g EKG (dry 72 hrs)
10g Challenger ((would go 20 next time)72hrs)
WLP023 Burton Ale yeast


Good drop that. Throws a bit of sulphur during latter stages of fermentation but don't be discouraged. Just give it a bit of time to clean up after itself and all will be good. Don't be afraid to run it a bit warmer than normal. I fermented this brew at 23 deg. and the esters were quite succulent indeed. :icon_drool2:
 

Wolfy

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According to my Brew Your Own Real British Ale book, most British Ales (including the Mild's) have the following grain bill:
Pale Malt 80-100%
Crystal Malt 0-10% (usually about 5-10%)
White Sugar 0-10% (usually about 5%)
Chocolate or Black malt (mostly for colour) 0-5% (usually very small %)

A significant minority of the recipes also include torrefied wheat, usually no more than 10%.

The majority of hops (Goldings, Fuggles, Challenger) added at the start of boil with a small % added toward the end of boil of flame-out.
 

Byran

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Thanks heaps for the tips everyone. I was gonna put a mash on this afternoon but worked a bit later than expected and will have to try tomorrow.
I found a .2kg of chocolate malt in my stash I will throw it in.
And I will leave out the sugar this time I want to try it without first to see what the yeast flavour is like just on the grain.

Cant wait. :lol:
 

Byran

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Ok done, got 23 litres to a no chill container.

Ended up using the same mash bill but dropped back to 350grams caramunich 1 and added 200grams chocolate.

Used 2grams Calcium sulfate and 1 gram epsom salts for the mods. Balanced.

Double infusion mash. 64 for half an hour, stepped to 68 for 20 mins then mash out, sparge and boiled 15grams of left over williamette and about 4 grams of POR to make up the IBU first wort.


Pitching tomoz.

Im that excited about this one for some reason............
 

Bribie G

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Yes definitely the chocolate malt. Edit: the yeast will love the sulphates, for that "Burton Snatch". If you want it full flavoured but lower alcohol, try mashing at 69 - 70.
 

Malted

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Edit: the yeast will love the sulphates, for that "Burton Snatch".
I tried a Burton union in the wee hours of Sunday morning for a bit of Malted upon Burton Snatch. She didn't feel very Burtonised so it was more of a help yourself type of thing; she is such a Yorkshire Square at that time of the day. None the less, I successfully fermented out; actually I almost did a double drop. Burton is a great place to live.
 

Byran

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I tried a Burton union in the wee hours of Sunday morning for a bit of Malted upon Burton Snatch. She didn't feel very Burtonised so it was more of a help yourself type of thing; she is such a Yorkshire Square at that time of the day. None the less, I successfully fermented out; actually I almost did a double drop. Burton is a great place to live.
How was the fermentation Malted?

I prefer slow....then fast. That Burton really does like to get fermented.......
 

Malted

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How was the fermentation Malted?

I prefer slow....then fast. That Burton really does like to get fermented.......
I am glad you asked!

As with all things the conditions have to be just right for a successful fermentation; prior to that there is quite a bit of coaxing involved to get a mash going. Generally at the start of a mash I will probe the grist to make sure that it suitably prepared. In this instance the lick her ratio was too low and consequently the mash was a bit dry; it did seem to me like a fairly complete grind and I was expecting a good conversion ratio. I just added some external liquids and kept mashing; it seemed to work for me.

Towards the end of the mash it was developing a bit of harshness but I may have mashed for too long. Perhaps I should have mashed hotter. At the completion of the mash it seemed to develop some astringency but that may have just been the vinegar stroke. Despite this apparent acetic presence, there were certainly no infection problems.

I was up for a reiterated mash but the grist was spent. I know a partigyle is certainly out of the equation as I have proposed this in the past and have been told that there will be no additional grists in my brewing. It is not that I am bored with the same grist, it is the house ale after all but I wonder what it would be like to use several grists in the same brew session. Prior to this house ale I experimented with some novel brewing techniques such as under letting the mash and some international grists; mashing an Irish red grist at all times of the night was exceptionally good. I enjoyed them all but seem to have settled for the house ale I am currently brewing.

I dumped the krausen onto her chest to avoid any unwanted products. The fermentation was quite vigorous with a thick, creamy, layer of krausen spewing out onto her chest. She then sparged her grist in the shower; I didn't keep the runnings from that. Cleanliness, sanitisation and good hygiene practices are the key to having a successful fermentation and avoiding unwanted nasties. Some folks wrap their fermenter top in glad wrap but I prefer an open top ferment. I feel it produces more of an authentic fermentation with more enjoyable and refined characteristics. Of course novices shouldn't attempt this themselves, it is a process that requires precise timing and you have to have an in depth knowledge and synchronicity with your equipment. I suppose you could say this is risky brewing but I have been brewing this way for over three years without any unwanted nasties. One could say that there is a lag phase between fermentation and unwanted nasties appearing but despite this being about 9 months, there are early signs that something is amiss. If you take necessary precautions and use you're equipment properly you can brew this way. It is called traditional brewing and was how it was originally done.

Regarding the provenance of my malt, I have met the plant breeders and they are of good disposition and must be good producers as they have three different malts. My malt is very good, a younger malt is probably of more use for VB and the youngest malt appears to be of exceptional quality. I have never brewed with the other malts so can't compare them. I reckon a great many brewers would like to mash the youngest malt. I hope one day to produce my own malts from my seed. I know that most folks generally don't get much time to brew once they start malting so I am content for now just to keep brewing. It must be said that I don't get to brew often enough but I suppose most blokes think that at some stage. Sometimes on the internet, particularly when I haven't brewed for a while, I will look at the grist of other malts and other brewers mashing them. I prefer not to see too much of the brewer in action but more over the malts getting mashed. I particularly like several malts that are well rounded in the top end yet thinner in the body mashing together with the brewer. These sorts of malts appear to be mostly European malts. I am led to believe that a lot of UK malts will mash on the first occasion, you don't even need to get them back to the brewery. I know I mashed that Irish red at a variety of locations both indoors and outdoors.

Depending on the conditions, sometimes my domestic malt will produce good head and at other times it won't. Sometimes with the domestic malt it is possible that if the conditions are not perfect, you won't get a complete fermentation, brewing is always good though. Sometimes the krausen is thick, creamy, large in volume and is expelled at high velocity. At others times the krausen is of lesser abundance.
 

Byran

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I am glad you asked!

As with all things the conditions have to be just right for a successful fermentation; prior to that there is quite a bit of coaxing involved to get a mash going. Generally at the start of a mash I will probe the grist to make sure that it suitably prepared. In this instance the lick her ratio was too low and consequently the mash was a bit dry; it did seem to me like a fairly complete grind and I was expecting a good conversion ratio. I just added some external liquids and kept mashing; it seemed to work for me.

Towards the end of the mash it was developing a bit of harshness but I may have mashed for too long. Perhaps I should have mashed hotter. At the completion of the mash it seemed to develop some astringency but that may have just been the vinegar stroke. Despite this apparent acetic presence, there were certainly no infection problems.

I was up for a reiterated mash but the grist was spent. I know a partigyle is certainly out of the equation as I have proposed this in the past and have been told that there will be no additional grists in my brewing. It is not that I am bored with the same grist, it is the house ale after all but I wonder what it would be like to use several grists in the same brew session. Prior to this house ale I experimented with some novel brewing techniques such as under letting the mash and some international grists; mashing an Irish red grist at all times of the night was exceptionally good. I enjoyed them all but seem to have settled for the house ale I am currently brewing.

I dumped the krausen onto her chest to avoid any unwanted products. The fermentation was quite vigorous with a thick, creamy, layer of krausen spewing out onto her chest. She then sparged her grist in the shower; I didn't keep the runnings from that. Cleanliness, sanitisation and good hygiene practices are the key to having a successful fermentation and avoiding unwanted nasties. Some folks wrap their fermenter top in glad wrap but I prefer an open top ferment. I feel it produces more of an authentic fermentation with more enjoyable and refined characteristics. Of course novices shouldn't attempt this themselves, it is a process that requires precise timing and you have to have an in depth knowledge and synchronicity with your equipment. I suppose you could say this is risky brewing but I have been brewing this way for over three years without any unwanted nasties. One could say that there is a lag phase between fermentation and unwanted nasties appearing but despite this being about 9 months, there are early signs that something is amiss. If you take necessary precautions and use you're equipment properly you can brew this way. It is called traditional brewing and was how it was originally done.

Regarding the provenance of my malt, I have met the plant breeders and they are of good disposition and must be good producers as they have three different malts. My malt is very good, a younger malt is probably of more use for VB and the youngest malt appears to be of exceptional quality. I have never brewed with the other malts so can't compare them. I reckon a great many brewers would like to mash the youngest malt. I hope one day to produce my own malts from my seed. I know that most folks generally don't get much time to brew once they start malting so I am content for now just to keep brewing. It must be said that I don't get to brew often enough but I suppose most blokes think that at some stage. Sometimes on the internet, particularly when I haven't brewed for a while, I will look at the grist of other malts and other brewers mashing them. I prefer not to see too much of the brewer in action but more over the malts getting mashed. I particularly like several malts that are well rounded in the top end yet thinner in the body mashing together with the brewer. These sorts of malts appear to be mostly European malts. I am led to believe that a lot of UK malts will mash on the first occasion, you don't even need to get them back to the brewery. I know I mashed that Irish red at a variety of locations both indoors and outdoors.

Depending on the conditions, sometimes my domestic malt will produce good head and at other times it won't. Sometimes with the domestic malt it is possible that if the conditions are not perfect, you won't get a complete fermentation, brewing is always good though. Sometimes the krausen is thick, creamy, large in volume and is expelled at high velocity. At others times the krausen is of lesser abundance.
Wow Malty! You really know your mash!
I read a book once that had many interesting mashing techniques......I think it was from India.

All that aside Im gonna pitch the shit out of this one tomorrow :D
 

razz

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I just did a quick mash before dinner (well not that quick) :rolleyes:
 

robbo5253

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That is one of the funniest things i have ever read!
 

Byran

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Boys!

The Burton ale Version 1 is now in the keg!
Tastes clean and crisp and malty with light chocolate, caramel and charcoal overtones, really deep brown in colour and the yeast flocced well so its pretty clear and it hasnt had much time to bake.

Great style I just made another one with the same recipe minus the choc and caramunic.
Used 0.5kg cararoma and 0.5kg of Abbey for that caramel biscuit kick.

Fucken stoked with this style and yeast. :icon_chickcheers:
 

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