• We have implemented the ability to gift someone a Supporting Membership now! When you access the Upgrade page there is now a 'Gift' button. Once you click that you can enter a username to gift an account Upgrade to. Great way to help support this forum plus give some kudos to anyone who has helped you.

Burnt Rubber?)

Aussie Home Brewer

Help Support Aussie Home Brewer:

tonyt

Well-Known Member
Joined
1/12/10
Messages
218
Reaction score
3
Hey all,Have been brewing for a couple of years now.....and loving it!Recently, every other brew or so has a burnt rubber aroma, cant really taste it,it is more a smell. Haven't changed procedures or recipes.And i can't seem to find any rhyme or reason to it. Any one have any idea as to what it can be?
Cheers
 

Wolfy

Well-Known Member
Joined
18/12/08
Messages
3,872
Reaction score
64
Location
Melbourne
"Burnt rubber" taste and smell is usually associated with autolysis - yeast cells dying and splitting open - which is usually caused by leaving the beer on the yeast too long or (maybe in this case) the fermentor was too warm after the fermentation was finished?
 

bignath

"Grains don't grow up to be chips, son"
Joined
3/11/08
Messages
2,611
Reaction score
40
Hmmmm, "burnt rubber" you say.....

didn't use that "turbo yeast" did you? :huh:









...joking.

I have no idea. I have a handy little app on my ipad called "beer defects" and lists a lot of the problems and cures for the most common beer defects, but burnt rubber isn't mentioned.

Whatever Wolfy says when it comes to yeast is usually considered the bible, so go with what he reckons...
 

Wolfy

Well-Known Member
Joined
18/12/08
Messages
3,872
Reaction score
64
Location
Melbourne
Whatever Wolfy says when it comes to yeast is usually considered the bible, so go with what he reckons...
I just remember what I read in books or at least a vague enough idea so I can find the reference when needed.
In this case it's Mr John Palmer: http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter10-3.html
... which incidentally is also the first result in a Google search for "burnt rubber beer", so i can't take much credit for that one. :icon_cheers:
 

thedragon

Off topic...
Joined
25/9/10
Messages
798
Reaction score
139
After my first few brews I worked out that higher temp = faster fermentation. Sit the fermentation on top of the ducted heating vent and FG is reached within 7 days.

Great, you may say. No. Could not be worse. The beer tasted like burnt rubber. And burnt rubber tastes like shit. I don't understand the scientific reasons why, but all I know is that lower, constant temperature makes better beer.
 

pyrosx

Well-Known Member
Joined
7/8/11
Messages
284
Reaction score
23
First step: Attack it with science: is there anything common to the smelly brews that isn't involved in the others: same fermenter? same shop the kit was bought to (i'm assuming you're kit'n'kilo'ing?). If there's something you're doing differently in the smelly brews than the good ones, no matter how subtle, that's where you should look.

My other thought, as it's the only time i've ever tasted a rubbery plastic smell, is: are you getting water through a garden hose, or some other kind of not-totally-food-quality tap or attachment? This is pretty simple to test actually - go grab a glass of water from whereever you fill your fermenter.... does it taste weird?
 

pyrosx

Well-Known Member
Joined
7/8/11
Messages
284
Reaction score
23
higher temp = faster fermentation.

Could not be worse. The beer tasted like burnt rubber.
QFT.

High ferment temps are a pretty decent explanation of a rubbish tasting beer

Best homebrew purchase you'll ever make is an old freezer/fridge and an STC-1000 setup - you will, never, ever look back after organising yourself a temperature controlled fermentation setup.
 

tonyt

Well-Known Member
Joined
1/12/10
Messages
218
Reaction score
3
First step: Attack it with science: is there anything common to the smelly brews that isn't involved in the others: same fermenter? same shop the kit was bought to (i'm assuming you're kit'n'kilo'ing?). If there's something you're doing differently in the smelly brews than the good ones, no matter how subtle, that's where you should look.

My other thought, as it's the only time i've ever tasted a rubbery plastic smell, is: are you getting water through a garden hose, or some other kind of not-totally-food-quality tap or attachment? This is pretty simple to test actually - go grab a glass of water from whereever you fill your fermenter.... does it taste weird?
[/quote
Have tried to rule out any changes, but cant seem to think of any? And as i said it is happeningEvery second brew or so???
Cheers
 

yum beer

Not in the house, you've got a shed..
Joined
12/3/11
Messages
2,239
Reaction score
422
hey tony, are you keeping accurate records of your brews such as pitching temp, ferment temp, ingredients.

pretty sure you will find a common issue with the rubbery batches.
 

tonyt

Well-Known Member
Joined
1/12/10
Messages
218
Reaction score
3
hey tony, are you keeping accurate records of your brews such as pitching temp, ferment temp, ingredients.

pretty sure you will find a common issue with the rubbery batches.
Ok, i keep records of everything and nothing is different.... At least what i can tell. Also have temp control.Only thing that may make sense is.. I filter, and just before i do, i have sometimesRun hot water through the filter housing and lines, just to flush any crap that mayBe there.The lines in filter system are the cheap clear type. Just wondering if theHot water, when it softens the plastic lines it releases the odour????
 

bignath

"Grains don't grow up to be chips, son"
Joined
3/11/08
Messages
2,611
Reaction score
40
Ok, i keep records of everything and nothing is different.... At least what i can tell. Also have temp control.Only thing that may make sense is.. I filter, and just before i do, i have sometimesRun hot water through the filter housing and lines, just to flush any crap that mayBe there.The lines in filter system are the cheap clear type. Just wondering if theHot water, when it softens the plastic lines it releases the odour????
Quite possible.

Dont filter the next batch and see if you get the same flavour.

Ive started making my morning coffee by putting my mug with water in it into the microwave, heating, and then adding the coffee and sugar, instead of using the kettle.

Our kettle is a cheapo piece of shit, and i notice the plasticy smell and taste from the kettle materials in my cuppa. Not had the same flvour or aroma since doing this...
 

Nick JD

Blah Blah Blah
Joined
4/11/08
Messages
7,322
Reaction score
453
I added 15% Carafa 3 to a Swartz once. Tasted like licking the road on a hot summer's day.

Went really nice with burnt sausages and dead horse. I recall I poured a bucketload of boysenberry syrup in it. Then it became completely weird.

But I suspect the OP's problem is a yeast issue, not filling the beer with so much blackened malt it tastes like tar.
 

bradsbrew

Who's up for a pint?
Joined
22/5/08
Messages
0
Reaction score
4
I associate the smell of vegemite with autolysis. just went to the pantry a had a big wiff of vegemite and yes I guess a slight hint of burnt rubber
 

Nick JD

Blah Blah Blah
Joined
4/11/08
Messages
7,322
Reaction score
453
Just a long shot, but a lot of the "burnt rubber" stuff I've read points back to sulphites ... the term "sulphitic" is often associated with wines tasting of burnt rubber. Mercaptans (smell like sewer to me ie. warm glass of VB aroma) from yeast being too warm have also been described as "rubber".

OP, are you using a sulphite sanitiser? What's the water like there - town supply?

Autolysis IMO doesn't smell like burnt rubber, smells like vegemite. I get it in all my old trub samples, and if anything was going to smell like burnt rubber it'd be them.
 

Latest posts

Top