Burnt Rubber Taste

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GregTheBrewer

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It will be very interesting to hear how the old yeast goes Livo. I imagine you might get a bit of activity, it just won't be brisk! My apologies BTW: you have done all grain in the past, so please excuse if I have been trying to teach you to suck eggs!
Clearly you have some expertise with yeast, so that's great. And I agree...do whatever works for you. Interestingly, on one recent email I got (not this forum) there was a link to a video from Fermentis where they were saying that there is no longer any need to rehydrate (their) dry yeast any more. I found this very interesting, since from a biochemistry point of view it always made sense to me to rehydrate the yeast. As I said, that has been my practice, and since I'm comfortable with it and get good results, I'll probably keep doing it!
 

livo

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I've found that a lot has changed (even in just a decade) and I also saw that rehydrating is not required. Also making a starter out of dried yeast is frowned upon and washing yeast has become a far more complicated process than it used to be, all thanks to Youtube experts. Whether rehydrating still improves performance is up for conjecture I suppose. If it doesn't hurt, what's the harm?

The decade old yeast, Coopers and Brigalow, packets were all dead (nearly all). They had (mostly) turned a very dark brown and showed no signs of life. However, I had 2 Coopers packs that looked different on the front and were marked "Intl" with the date code "35011". 350th day of 2011 and that would be about right. Maybe from my cans of Mexican Cerveza back then, that I used to brew 50/50 with Lager and reused yeast in 2 parallel fermenters. (Early toucans but I didn't know it.) These packets were clearly made up of 2 different yeasts and one had remained light in colour while the other was the dark brown. They showed some signs of life but I didn't pursue it. Obviously the dark brown yeast was dead but the usual lighter coloured stuff had survived for a decade.

The surprise packet was one that I don't even know where it came from. It was in a white paper outer / foil inner packet with the title "Premium Beer Yeast". It had no other markings to indicate age but it must be 10 years old or more. It bounced into life and started frothing away within minutes. The Coopers and Brigalows were in the usual foil only packs (Gold and Silver respectively) and I'm pretty sure the Brigalows were from Apple Cider kits. I used to make Apple Cider Vinegar for my wife's horses using the Brigalow kits because they were the cheapest.

Anyway, I know that boiled dead yeast is a good yeast nutrient and I had to save 25 kg of sugar from a pack of invading black ants that has just decided this el nino weather is a good reason to move into my shed. I have a whole big batch of hand sanitiser just started.

PS: My dad used to pinch my glass marbles and my mums nylons to boil up his AG brews back in the 1960s. I loved brew weekends because the smell was amazing. We had to play Jacks instead of marbles though. I still have my AG gear but I'm time poor at the moment.
 

GregTheBrewer

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Anyway, I know that boiled dead yeast is a good yeast nutrient and I had to save 25 kg of sugar from a pack of invading black ants that has just decided this el nino weather is a good reason to move into my shed. I have a whole big batch of hand sanitiser just started.
I hear you Livo! Bugger about the ants, but glad to hear that hand sanitiser is on the cards. I've been known to do something similar myself LOL!
 

GregTheBrewer

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Naturally, naturally....I have been known to use molasses for aroma in mine! ;)
 

livo

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PS: Just been out and bought a few cans including 2 Brigalow. These are supplied with 5 g yeast packs and the instructions say the yeast is suitable for 16 - 35'C "to suite Australian conditions". Best pitched at 30'C and fermented at 27'C.
Well I've been reading a lot of really bad stuff about Brigalow beer kits. I used to use their Cider kits to make my wife's ACV with the addition of 80% after fermentation and then sat in cloth covered open buckets. I did make a few sweet ciders as well, but it is a long time since my first Brigalow beer pack with the black fermenter and cup airlock. I don't remember enjoying it or what can came in the kit.

The 2 cans I bought are the Munich Lager. Any tips for these? Should have done due diligence before checkout, I know, but someone must have done something with these. They are still available and still cheap.
 

MHB

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I think I used one of those cans a a door stop for a couple of years...
M
 

livo

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Oh dear!! Did it get any better from the aging?
 

GregTheBrewer

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Wish I could help Livo. I have only used the apple cider kits myself.
 

livo

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Well as it's going to be hot in the shed for the next week or more, and with the kit being provided with what could be assumed to be bakers yeast, I've made a batch of warm Munich Lager. 1/3 each of LDME, dextrose and big head. I figure it can't be worse than burnt rubber. I didn't get it up to 35'C to pitch but it should get up to the recommended 27'C ferment temperature before long. You guys are too fussy and I can't wait to taste it. Lucky I bought 2 cans.
 

livo

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You guys are too fussy and I can't wait to taste it. Lucky I bought 2 cans.
Brigalow Munich Lager (/w supplied yeast)
At first impressions I think I'm going to need to eat my words.
I did a hydrometer reading yesterday and taste tested. Bluuurrgh!!! It is definitely going to need to improve in the bottle or it will be a down the drain job even if it has no defects caused by me. After sampling the lager with proper yeast by comparison it is absolute crap. There was no hint of beer flavour and it can only be likened to muddy water.
Do you need a new Home Brew themed door stop MHB?
I suppose I'll try the 2nd can with a different yeast to see if it makes an acceptable drink.
 

Westheimer

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Brigalow Munich Lager (/w supplied yeast)
At first impressions I think I'm going to need to eat my words.
I did a hydrometer reading yesterday and taste tested. Bluuurrgh!!! It is definitely going to need to improve in the bottle or it will be a down the drain job even if it has no defects caused by me. After sampling the lager with proper yeast by comparison it is absolute crap. There was no hint of beer flavour and it can only be likened to muddy water.
Do you need a new Home Brew themed door stop MHB?
I suppose I'll try the 2nd can with a different yeast to see if it makes an acceptable drink.
Hi Livo
You don't seem to have a lot of luck in the homebrew department lately😬😳
Can I suggest to try pressure ferment with 34/70 @ 22-24°C. Well worth considering
Cheers 🍻
 

livo

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I've got good beer to drink, but I'm repeating old mistakes from other people, because I can't be told what to do. :)

I read that Brigalow was crapola toilet water. Had to find out for myself because you cant believe everything out there. Not a huge loss for me. so it's all good.

I should have made a Youtube video, like all the other mugs posting crap.
 
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livo

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Well this Brigalow Munich Lager is still very green and it is rubbish beer but it isn't as bad as I'd expected. Of course it tastes like crap but it isn't as bad as the autolysis burnt batches I had to dump so the yeast provided must be able to cope with the elevated temperature as it's claimed. Still absolute rubbish though and I doubt very much I'll bother with the second can. Although I have read that it can improve with a lot of conditioning. The other alternative is to try it with a different yeast in temperature controlled fermentation.
 

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