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Bunnings Water Drums

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Crusty

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Anyone using the Bunnings 25lt water drums for no chill?
They state that they are suitable for drinking water but can't see anything on them that is HDPE etc.
 

homebrewkid

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Anyone using the Bunnings 25lt water drums for no chill?
They state that they are suitable for drinking water but can't see anything on them that is HDPE etc.

IMHO if they are safe for drinking they would be food grade and have the required temperature ratings that go with it = safe in my books.

cheers: HBK
 

brettprevans

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They r foodgrade. Use them as fermentors no chill, grain storage etc. they r great. I Have 3.
 

Crusty

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Thanks guys.
I grabbed one at Bunnings the other day on impulse & realized when I got home that there were no markings on them so that drew some insecurities. Great stuff.
Cheers
 

mondestrunken

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IMHO if they are safe for drinking they would be food grade and have the required temperature ratings that go with it = safe in my books.

cheers: HBK
I've been wondering about this, specifically hot liquids in plastic containers.

Can someone point me in the direction of something that will explain what plastics are friendly with large quantities of almost boiling, acidic, sugary water?
 

Crusty

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I've been wondering about this, specifically hot liquids in plastic containers.

Can someone point me in the direction of something that will explain what plastics are friendly with large quantities of almost boiling, acidic, sugary water?
Ross @CraftBrewer has these which I think are marked as HDPE plastic.
I just grabbed one on impulse when I was at Bunnings & there's nothing on the drum with the HDPE symbol.
 

homebrewkid

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I've been wondering about this, specifically hot liquids in plastic containers.

Can someone point me in the direction of something that will explain what plastics are friendly with large quantities of almost boiling, acidic, sugary water?

sorry mate the only way i can see to get a copy of the standard relating to this [AS2070-1999] is to pay around $100 for it

google is your friend here punch in the numbers and see what comes up

good luck

cheers: HBK
 

Dazza88

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I asked the bmw manufacturer (bunnings containers) a few years back, they are hdpe.

If not they will probably look like a salvador dali melting clock picture when you add near boiling liquid into them.

I have also been told by another industry person 80C is the standard for hot packing HDPE containers - this is the deformation point for this plastic but it isn't the leaching / break down point - 130C is the melting point. Sanitation is effective at 80C (not sterile, sanitary).

I no chill around 85C mainly cause i dont like the container getting too soft when i have no chilled closer to 100C.

Look here for properties of various plastics: http://www.dynalabcorp.com/technical_info_..._properties.asp (lab supply websites a good source of info)
 

iralosavic

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I have one (25L size). Haven't had any problems since I got it. I don't use it that much anymore - mostly as secondary/cold conditioning.
 

Cube

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If you are talking about the drums commonly used for fermenting in with the big red lids with a central t-bar moulded into the lid I'd shy away from using it as a no chill cube. You'll never get those lids to seal and that is why everyone using them as fermenters just glad wrap the tops.

Try filling one with water and tipping it over, up ended etc. If it seals it would be a one off fluke. After a few more goes it will leak 100%
 

Crusty

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If you are talking about the drums commonly used for fermenting in with the big red lids with a central t-bar moulded into the lid I'd shy away from using it as a no chill cube. You'll never get those lids to seal and that is why everyone using them as fermenters just glad wrap the tops.

Try filling one with water and tipping it over, up ended etc. If it seals it would be a one off fluke. After a few more goes it will leak 100%
Nah, not those.
It's the 25lt cubes for drinking water with the black screw top lid.
Look identical to the sponsors ones, just a tad bigger.
 

brettprevans

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Shouldhave mentioned to haver a search. Its covered on ahb in other threads for all those wanting more info
 

cam89brewer

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I've looked in my local bunnings many times and kind find any of these....
 

Fat Bastard

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I've looked in my local bunnings many times and kind find any of these....
I think they've got supply problems at the moment. I had to drive around 4 different Bunnings before I found a couple last weekend.
 

mondestrunken

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Look here for properties of various plastics: http://www.dynalabcorp.com/technical_info_..._properties.asp (lab supply websites a good source of info)
Thanks. This is the kind of thing that I'm after.

Shouldhave mentioned to haver a search. Its covered on ahb in other threads for all those wanting more info
I have searched a couple of times. Consensus seems to be HDPE, and it's OK because the guy in bunnings said it's food safe. Is there anything more definitive than this?
 

TSMill

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sorry mate the only way i can see to get a copy of the standard relating to this [AS2070-1999] is to pay around $100 for it

google is your friend here punch in the numbers and see what comes up

good luck

cheers: HBK
4020:2005 is the other relevant australian standard (testing of materials in contact with potable water). statements of compliance don't always indicate if the material is rated for hot or cold service, the latter only requires the material to pass at up to 50C.
 

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