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Bubbling wheat beer

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brend0n

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Hi all, I put down my first wheat beer, used good quality yeast etc, I think I may have an issue with it cos it stopped fermenting after about 5-6 days? I pulled it out the fridge and it started again only for another day, looking through the lid it has heaps of tiny bubbles across the top of the wort? Never seen this before? Ideas anyone
 

.DJ.

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what does the hydro say? that the only way to tell if fermentation is complete.
Listing your ingredients and volumes will also help...
 

Edak

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heaps of tiny bubbles is normal for beer in fermenter, but I guess a picture would also be worth a 1000 words..
 

drew9242

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Relax, don't stress. It is probably nearly finished. If you are worried something has gone wrong, have a taste. If you used a good yeast then it will taste great after 6 days. Then just leave it for a week then keg. Stressing about home brewing is bad for your health
 

brend0n

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Went down on the 25th march ESB wheat beer,saf wb-06 dry wheat yeast,12gm Saaz, 500gm LM, 250 dex, 250 corn syrup (powder)
Sg 1040
Sitting on 1012 now? Tasted ok, so I guess it's not infected, so ill chill it at 1 degree till next Monday and keg it, recipe sound ok? I've left it at room temp for the day just to make sure she's finished
 

Midnight Brew

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Sometimes the yeast just likes to keep on partying at the top. Completely normal and nothing to worry about. After a day or two back in the fridge all the krausen will sink down.
 

NewtownClown

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brend0n said:
Went down on the 25th march ESB wheat beer,saf wb-06 dry wheat yeast,12gm Saaz, 500gm LM, 250 dex, 250 corn syrup (powder)
Sg 1040
Sitting on 1012 now? Tasted ok, so I guess it's not infected, so ill chill it at 1 degree till next Monday and keg it, recipe sound ok? I've left it at room temp for the day just to make sure she's finished
Why crash chill a wheat beer?
 

NewtownClown

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brend0n said:
Hi all, I put down my first wheat beer, used good quality yeast etc, I think I may have an issue with it cos it stopped fermenting after about 5-6 days? I pulled it out the fridge and it started again only for another day, looking through the lid it has heaps of tiny bubbles across the top of the wort? Never seen this before? Ideas anyone
ales can often complete fermentation in under 5 days, easily. When you pulled it from the fridge, it warmed up plus the movement caused c02 to be released which may give an impression of activity if you are an airlock watcher. Either that or your initial ferment temp. was too low and it "woke up" again.

Also I am confused, isn't "corn syrup (powder)" Dextrose?
 

carniebrew

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NewtownClown said:
...
Also I am confused, isn't "corn syrup (powder)" Dextrose?
No, corn syrup is maltodextrin.
 

brend0n

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So Newtown, you don't crash chill a wheat beer? I'm still learning so advice is massively appreciated, I've always chilled my lagers for clarity I thought it'd be the same?
 

NewtownClown

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So corn syrup is maltodextrin and corn sugar is dextrose... cheers.



Black Devil Dog said:
Why ask rhetorical questions?
Ditto!

Seriously, I wanted to know why one would crash chill a wheat beer? He may have a great reason, a nugget of info he picked up somewhere, a process I am unaware of (of which, I am sure, there are many).
I often get from grain to glass in 7-10 days when brewing wheats - especially a Heffeweizen.
 

NewtownClown

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brend0n said:
So Newtown, you don't crash chill a wheat beer? I'm still learning so advice is massively appreciated, I've always chilled my lagers for clarity I thought it'd be the same?
I would if brewing a Krystalweizen. I would also fine and filter. Personally, I love the taste and mouthfeel that "mit-heffe" adds to wheat beer. Wb-06 is a low flocculating yeast and sedimentation is quite poor. Trying to get a crystal clear beer with it is like pushing boulders up hill...
 

Wolfman

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My understanding is a Weizen is not suppose to be clear? Am I missing something?
 

NewtownClown

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Wolfman said:
My understanding is a Weizen is not suppose to be clear? Am I missing something?
as the name suggests, a Krystal-Weizen is clear...
 

carniebrew

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Wolfman said:
My understanding is a Weizen is not suppose to be clear? Am I missing something?
It depends on which weizen....as NewtownClown suggested, a Kristallweizen should be served clear, but most of the other weizen styles, hefe/dunkel etc would normally be served cloudy, with the yeast in suspension.
 

brend0n

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Done, no crash chillin, as said earlier learning along the way, my first wheat beer so I'm keen to try it, will keg if and post results thx everyone time to do some research
 

seamad

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There is some misinformation regarding dextrose, corn syrup, maltodextrin here.

What is dextrose?
Dextrose is the commercial name used for the crystalline glucose produced from starch. If the crystallized dextrose (glucose) contains no water, it is listed as "dextrose anhydrous" or "anhydrous dextrose" in an ingredient statement. If the crystallized dextrose contains one molecule of water, it will be listed as "dextrose" or "dextrose monohydrate" in an ingredient statement. The majority of the dextrose listed in food ingredient statements began as cornstarch.
Food manufacturers may list dextrose produced from cornstarch as "corn sugar" in an ingredient statement. If the dextrose comes from another source like rice or wheat, the ingredient list would read "rice sugar" or "wheat sugar," respectively.
Dextrose is used in many baking products like cake mixes and frostings, snack foods like cookies, crackers and pretzels, and desserts like custards and sherbets. Dextrose is also used as a filler in the single-serve, table-top packets of the common artificial sweeteners

What is corn syrup?
The singular term "corn syrup" is somewhat of a misnomer because it is used to identify a group of sweeteners that differ from one another simply by the amount of dextrose (glucose) present in the commercial syrup. Since only a single type of corn syrup is generally used in a food product, the term "corn syrup" is permitted in an ingredient statement. However, consumers have no idea how much glucose is contained in the particular "corn syrup" listed in an ingredient statement. A commercial "corn syrup" may contain between 20% and 98% dextrose (glucose).
"Corn syrup" may also be called "glucose syrup" in an ingredient list.
Corn syrups are used in many of today's salad dressings, tomato sauces, powdered drink mixes, fruit drinks and juices, and frozen desserts like pudding and ice milk.

What are corn syrup solids?
When a corn syrup has been concentrated to contain less than 10% water, it can be listed as "corn syrup solids" in an ingredient statement. To qualify as "corn syrup solids," the glucose (dextrose) content must be at least 88% of the weight of the concentrated syrup. This product can be called "dried glucose syrup" or "glucose syrup solids" in an ingredient list.
Corn syrup solids are used in the same types of foods as dextrose and corn syrups.


What is maltodextrin?
A maltodextrin is a short chain of molecularly linked dextrose (glucose) molecules, and is manufactured by regulating the hydrolysis of starch. Typical commercial maltodextrins contain as few as three and as many as nineteen linked dextrose units.
While the singular term "maltodextrin" is permitted in an ingredient statement, the term "maltodextrin" can be applied to any starch hydrolysis product that contains fewer than 20 dextrose (glucose) units linked together. This means that the term "maltodextrin" stands for a family of products, not a single distinct ingredient.
Additionally, today's commercially important maltodextrin products are produced from corn, potato or rice. Unlike the other starch sweeteners, the undefined term "maltodextrin" can be used in an ingredient list no matter the original source of starch.
Maltodextrins are used in a wide array of foods, from canned fruits to snacks. Maltodextrins may also be an ingredient in the single-serve, table-top packet of some artificial sweeteners.
 

jyo

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You're essentially going to crash chill it anyway when you bung your keg in the fridge for carbonating. I keep all my yeast in my keg fridge and don't really like the idea of putting 19 litres of 20' beer in there to fluctuate the temps so I always crash chill.
I personally have found the old adage of drink straight away to be a bit off the mark with wheats. ~3 weeks and I find them to be really hitting their straps.
 

Wolfman

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NewtownClown said:
as the name suggests, a Krystal-Weizen is clear...
Yer but the OP is not making a Krystal-Weizen or a Kristallweizen?? That was just you not answering the OP.

carniebrew said:
It depends on which weizen....as NewtownClown suggested, a Kristallweizen should be served clear, but most of the other weizen styles, hefe/dunkel etc would normally be served cloudy, with the yeast in suspension.
Thanks for the clarity on Wheat beers. This would have been good advice to the OP as all said was he was making a Wheat beer.

Mate I would crash for 2-3 days then keg. Still going to has some of that yummy yeast in suspension by the end of the keg.
 

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