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Bottling Yeast

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Quintrex

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Hi All
As a dedicated bottler, I'm after some advice as to what is the best bottling yeast to use.
My dilemma is this
I've made a kolsch and a couple of pilsners, which are the kind of beers which could be appreciated by the masses however when you take some bottles over to a mates the yeast gets stirred up and the pilsner and kolsch yeasts taste quite bitter.

I'm after a yeast that I could add after a lagering period, for bottle conditioning which will form a solid layer, but doesn't taste unpleasant if disturbed.

Any suggestions

Thanks
Q
 

Sunshine_Brewer

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Plain old coopers yeast works for me. Sometimes I put a bottle or two in the freezer on their sides for quick chilling and they still pour clear to the bottom. Ive done this with beer that has only conditioned in the bottle for nine days.
 

marlow_coates

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Haven't managed to achieve this yet. The best way is to make sure there isn't a lot of yeast in the bottle to start with so that there is minimal amount to be stirred up.

The bottle will carbonate even with very small numbers of yeast cells in the brew, it will just take some extra time.

I would recomend using a clearing agent in the secondary, chilling to drop as much yeast out of suspension, then filter into priming bucket before bottling.

This will get as much yeast as possible out of the beer going into the bottles. And will hopefully leave you with (slowly) carbonated bottles with only a fine layer of yeast at the base to be stirred up.

I find this works well for me but each to his own.

If you are finding that you need to add a yeast due to no live cells surviving the lagering period then I can't help as I have never lagered :lol:

Good luck.
 

Kai

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Hi All
As a dedicated bottler, I'm after some advice as to what is the best bottling yeast to use.
My dilemma is this
I've made a kolsch and a couple of pilsners, which are the kind of beers which could be appreciated by the masses however when you take some bottles over to a mates the yeast gets stirred up and the pilsner and kolsch yeasts taste quite bitter.

I'm after a yeast that I could add after a lagering period, for bottle conditioning which will form a solid layer, but doesn't taste unpleasant if disturbed.

Any suggestions

Thanks
Q
What exactly is your process here, are you filtering the yeast out and then adding more? Even after an extended lagering period you'll still have enough yeast in there to carbonate, as Mr Coates mentions. However if you're specifically after a different bottling strain then it might be worth considering that when commercial breweries use a different bottling strain they tend to use a lager yeast.
 

Quintrex

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Haven't managed to achieve this yet. The best way is to make sure there isn't a lot of yeast in the bottle to start with so that there is minimal amount to be stirred up.

The bottle will carbonate even with very small numbers of yeast cells in the brew, it will just take some extra time.

I would recomend using a clearing agent in the secondary, chilling to drop as much yeast out of suspension, then filter into priming bucket before bottling.

This will get as much yeast as possible out of the beer going into the bottles. And will hopefully leave you with (slowly) carbonated bottles with only a fine layer of yeast at the base to be stirred up.

Good luck.
I suppose this is what I've been aiming for with my last 2 beers of this type, it's worked alright, thanks for your advice.
Out of interest how long do you find your beers done this way take to condition and be at their peak?


What exactly is your process here, are you filtering the yeast out and then adding more? Even after an extended lagering period you'll still have enough yeast in there to carbonate, as Mr Coates mentions. However if you're specifically after a different bottling strain then it might be worth considering that when commercial breweries use a different bottling strain they tend to use a lager yeast.
I had heard that this was the case, why is that? As most lager yeasts seem to be more bitter than their ale counterparts.

Is it for more consistent conditioning results regardless of temperature? Are you at liberty to disclose what LC use?

Thanks guys
Q
 

marlow_coates

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I usually leave a month before first tastings - the advantage of having kegged beer as well :icon_cheers:
All have been fully carbed by that stage, and allowed a few weeks to clear.
Of course they taste better after another month or two depending on style.

I am a big believer in have a solid stock pile of beer so that the choices are many :icon_drunk:
 

Stubbie

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Hi Q,
Have you thought about bottling with near zero headspace? It might help?
Stubbie.
 

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