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Belgians, blonde or wit

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Tahoose

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G'day all been enjoying some Belgian beers lately, and am thinking of making a blonde or a wit or maybe both.

What do you like for yeast strains? As far as I know there doesn't seem to be a good dry yeasts for this style (not after a Saison yeast)

For malts I have ale, Munich, pils, wheat and a couple of spec malts. Will most probably get whatever spec malt I need when I get the yeast.

For hops I have a bit of saaz and plenty of herkules and EKG.

Do you have any favourite recipes that you wouldn't mind sharing?

Thanks
 

sponge

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I made a saison for one of the beers for my wedding last year, and was (surprisingly) a hit amongst most of the guests. The keg was empty by the end of the night..

50% pils
47% wheat
3% xtal

1.049
18IBUs saaz @ FWH
Wy3726

3726 makes this beer, although have made a few decent saisons with the 3711.
 

manticle

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WY Forbidden fruit is lovely in a stronger pale Belgian (think Hoegaarden grand cru).

Not made a straight up wit although I have some wy wit yeast in the fridge waiting for me to have a crack. Since the yeast is so important, I wouldn't use anything but a wit yeast in a wit.
My Pale Belgians are almost always high gravity and the yeasts I use are to suit - 1388 or 1762. I wouldn't hesitate to use these for any pale belgian type though.

I've got decent recipes for some of the strong pale types I mention - what gravity range are you after? Sounds like you're chasing table beer more than tripel.

Have also used wy ardennes with some success too.
 

Tahoose

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Yeah I will definitely be investing in some quality yeast. Thinking something with an end state of about 5.5%.

My system is big enough however to make something big and some thing small, no chill both and ferment one after the other.

By the time I get around to the big beer it will be cool enough to bottle and store for the winter.
 

manticle

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For my larger belgians I use a base of belgian pils (dingemans in my case). With strong golden, it's pretty much pils only, with a tripel, I'll add in some vienna and with a grand cru (not a separate style as such - my homage to hoegaarden GC) a good amount (say 25% each of total base) of vienna and munich. More malt focused beers might also get a small hit of toasty specs like biscuit and aromatic, darks might get special b and/or caramunich.
Sugar (for pales I use dex, for dubbels and quads/darks, I'll use commercial d2 syrup) I add in in stages once main fermentation has slowed or stopped. This avoids hot alcohol characters which you should be less likely to get with a table beer anyway.
I step mash and often decoct.
Yeast starts at low end temps but is allowed to rise a degree or so a day until it is low- mid 20s.
3 week cold condition minimum.
Yeast is active, big starter.
Hops are always low aa noble or noble type, styrians favoured for any late/flavour hops. Hallertauer mittelfruh + styrians or saaz + styrians are 2 favourite combos.

These are steps that have made me quality belgian brews, comparable with commercial examples but as said - most of mine are bigger (8-12%) and a lot of these are tricks to make high grav beers attenuate well and stave off hot alcohol.
Hope that helps somewhat.
 

jyo

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This is one of my best witbiers. It's pretty similar to the one from Brewing Classic Styles from memory. I just did a protein rest at 52 for 5 minutes and then raised it to 66' for 60 minutes. Alcohol was a bit high for the style, but who's complaining B) The wyeast 3944 wit yeast tends to take a while to finish off, but it's well worth it.

I no-chill, so I add the spice and orange at whirlpool, then let sit for 10-15 minutes before cubing.


Total Grain (kg): 5.800
Total Hops (g): 45.00
Original Gravity (OG): 1.055 (°P): 13.6
Final Gravity (FG): 1.009 (°P): 2.3
Alcohol by Volume (ABV): 5.98 %
Colour (SRM): 3.8 (EBC): 7.5
Bitterness (IBU): 15.8 (Average)
Brewhouse Efficiency (%): 72
Boil Time (Minutes): 60

Grain Bill
----------------
3.000 kg Pilsner (51.72%)
2.200 kg Flaked Wheat (37.93%)
0.450 kg Flaked Oats (7.76%)
0.100 kg Acidulated Malt (1.72%)
0.050 kg Melanoidin (0.86%)

Hop Bill
----------------
45.0 g Hersbrucker Pellet (2.8% Alpha) @ 90 Minutes (Boil) (2 g/L)

Misc Bill
----------------
1.0 g Whirlfloc Tablet @ 10 Minutes (Boil)
15.0 g Coriander Seed @ 0 Minutes (Boil)
45.0 g Orange Peel @ 0 Minutes (Boil)

Fermented at 18°C with Wyeast 3944 - Belgian Witbier
 
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