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Belgian Saison - should I cold crash?

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r055c0

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Sorry if this has been asked and answered before, I did search but couldnt find anything. I'm brewing my first Saison with the Wyeast Belgian strain of yeast, gravity is sitting on 1.008 after 6 weeks in the fermenter. Should I cold crash before bottling or will that detract from the yeasty taste?
 

JDW81

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I wouldn't if it were my brew. Don't really see the point in something like a saison. Bottle/keg, carbonate and enjoy.

Out of interest have you got some serious peach esters going on? Last few I've made and smelt and tasted like they've got peach nectar in them. Bloody beautiful they were.

JD
 

r055c0

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It just occurred to me that although I've been getting beautiful spicy fresh yeast scents from the airlock everytime I walk past it I havent actually had a sip yet, trying some now and it is really nice. Definetly a fruityness to it although I'm not good enough at tasting to be able to pick out peach nectar.

Thanks for the advice, I'll bottle it tonight :)
 

Nick JD

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I get pear from 3725 @ 35C.

I prefer it served cloudy - like a hefe.
 

manticle

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I cold condition saisons. The yeasty esters and phenolics etc are already in the beer. No need to drink sediment as well.

Hefeweizen is probably the only beer I wouldn't do it for.
 

Nick JD

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manticle said:
I cold condition saisons. The yeasty esters and phenolics etc are already in the beer. No need to drink sediment as well.

Hefeweizen is probably the only beer I wouldn't do it for.
Commercial saisons are nearly all served cloudy.
 

mikec

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Once you keg it and put it in the fridge, you're basically cold crashing it though.
All the yeast goes to the bottom, a lot of which get's sucked out with the first pour, the rest sits there in perpetuity.
Yes a little bit might get through with each pour but I reckon it's negligible.
May as well CC before kegging, that way the beer in the keg is consistent, and you don't waste the first schooner.
 

Charst

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Nick JD said:
Commercial saisons are nearly all served cloudy.
Most commercial saisons have a proportion of wheat in them adding to the haze. I did a 100% pils saison ala Dupont and it was clear as a bell.
Havent had standard dupont in a while but i recall it being pretty clear.

Id crash. I want to taste the effects of the yeast fermentation not the yeast itself.
 

manticle

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Nick JD said:
Commercial saisons are nearly all served cloudy.
You mean with dregs/mit hefe? Usually customer choice where I purchase and considering the number of bottled as opposed to kegged available here, I can choose cloudy or clear. If I buy dupont at a bar, I usually ask if I can pour my own.

You don't need yeasty dregs to get yeast related flavours but it is, as always, a matter of preference. Cold conditioning drops out more than just yeast anyway - all my belgian beers benefit from a cold maturation period.
 

Nick JD

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I see your point. I prefer the yeast swirled and added in styles where it's part of the style.

In kegs I find that when the saison clears toward the end of the keg that it's missing something. A filtered, bright saison just seems so "un-farmhouse". Kind of beer that really should be served out of a fermenter.
 

manticle

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I find a rosy cheeked fille named Corinne serving it to me makes up for anything lacking.

Or Georgette.
 

r055c0

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Sounds delightful, where can I fine one of these Georgettes?
 

DUANNE

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mmost really big dipas i have bought have been rather hazy, do

Nick JD said:
Commercial saisons are nearly all served cloudy.
most big dipas ive drank have had considerable haze, does this mean i should be serving them with mixed in yeast? i find in most commercial saisons that they have a protien haze which like a hop haze has stuff all to do with yeast.
 

Nick JD

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I have not had a commercial saison that wasn't bottle conditioned. I like the yeast roused and added.

With Coopers I also do it. And hefeweizens.

I don't do it with other Belgians except a Wit.
 

hoppy2B

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Nick JD said:
I get pear from 3725 @ 35C.

I prefer it served cloudy - like a hefe.
Do you mean 3724, which is the Belgian Saison? 3725 is Biere de Garde.
 

Nick JD

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hoppy2B said:
Do you mean 3724, which is the Belgian Saison? 3725 is Biere de Garde.
Yeah. I always get those two numbers cornfuzed. I was meaning to try the French one this summer but forgot.

I get funky pepper from 3725.
 

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