Beer Recipe's Circa 1900's

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Rob S

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Hi guys,

My neighbour was cleaning out her recently deceased fathers house, and she found his grandfathers book of "stuff" (her great-grandfather). She's pushing 65 so I'm just taking a guess that the book may be from around early 1900's. Lots of notes on all sorts of things and a section on how to make beer. I'm not sure I'll attempt any of these recipe's but I thought I'd post them up here for interests sake. They are transposed directly from the diary word for word. I especially like "cool to blood heat".

Recipe for Beer

3 gallons water
3lbs brown sugar
4 ozs hops
1 tin extract of malt
1 handful of pearl barley
1 square inch of yeast

Place everything except yeast in a can and soak overnight
Simmer for two hours
When cooled down to lukewarm add yeast and skim every morning for three days and bottle

Ginger Beer

3 gallons water
3 lbs sugar
oz ginger
2 ozs hops
1 handful raisins

Boil for 20 minutes then strain
When cold add 3 tablespoons yeast making good with cold water the liquid that has boiled away.
Put in earthenware vessel and let work for 48 hours then bottle.

Add 2 tablespoons of pearl of barley if desired.

Homemade Beer

1 lb of malt
6 ozs hops
4 lbs sugar
1 tablespoonful of molasses

Mix and put in of kerosene tin of water
Boil steadily for one hour
Strain well
When cooled to blood heat add 1 dessert spoonful of powdered yeast
Stand two or three days
Skim well and then add half a lb of boiled sugar, 1 teaspoon of salt and 1 gallon of hot water.
Stand for 36 hours
Strain again and bottle.

Homemade Beer

Boil 4 ozs hops in one gallon of water for an hour
Dissolve 4 lbs of sugar and 2 lbs of malt in gallon of water
Remove hops and add sugar and malt and boil for an hour
Build up to 4 gallons with cold water and add yeast
Let brew for 7 days
Put 1 dessertspoon of sugar and one middie of water in each bottle and fill with brew
Ready in 7 days

Ginger Beer

of a kerosene tin of cold water
4 lbs sugar
2 teaspoons of cream of tartar
1 teaspoon of tartaric acid
oz of yeast, dissolve before adding to water
Stand 18 or so hours keep covered with damp cloth
Strain and bottle.
 

Bribie G

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Never mind the early 1900s, when I ran a LHBS in Maryborough QLD in the late 1970s the standard local brew was:

Kilo tin of Saunders Malt Extract
1.5 kg raw sugar
1 oz dried hops of any description, boiled in some water in a pan for 20 mins then strained
teaspoon parisian essence (caramel gravy browner)

sachet Tandaco bakers yeast

Ferment at 27 for a few days - well at least they had gone high tech with straining the hops and using dried yeast.

:p
 

bignath

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someone else around here dug up a book from a grandparent a while ago, and it had heaps of handwritten recipes in it.

Have no idea what the thread was called, but it was an interesting read.
 
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Mix and put in of kerosene tin of water
I'm not sure that "a hint of kerosene" is going to be good for the finished product. :icon_vomit: Other than to stop anyone else drinking your beer.

No wonder home brew has got a perception held by some people of being sh!te. Our forefathers have much to answer for.

Ahhh the good old days.
 

jasondwyer

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Never mind the early 1900s, when I ran a LHBS in Maryborough QLD in the late 1970s the standard local brew was:

Kilo tin of Saunders Malt Extract
1.5 kg raw sugar
1 oz dried hops of any description, boiled in some water in a pan for 20 mins then strained
teaspoon parisian essence (caramel gravy browner)

sachet Tandaco bakers yeast

Ferment at 27 for a few days - well at least they had gone high tech with straining the hops and using dried yeast.

:p
Just tried an experiment of this receipe
($7) 1kg Saunders malt
($2) 35g amarillo pellets boiled 20 minutes no straining
($1.5) 600 g dextrose
($0.75) half tablet of brigalow finishing hops
($1.16) brigalow brewing yeast
add water to 15 litres
Fermented in 5 days
3 days of cold crash(10 C) to get hop pellets to drop
SG 1047
FG 1007
ABV 5.25%
Had a taste today at bottling not too bad
2 - 3 weeks for the real test
I'm a noob and brew extract clones from the lhbs but this site is informative and fun thanks for your recipe
 

jasondwyer

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The Saunders malt extract beer experiment is quite tasty close to coopers larger just a little more bitter
:beerbang: :chug:
 

TheTaxidermist

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Hi guys my first post here. Just wanted to pick up something that got dropped along the way in the discussion above, "Parisian Essence." I figured after a bit of a lengthy search this was the best place to post the information I've gathered.


Queen Parisian Essence: Browning agent for browning gravies, soups, broths,beef tea, cakes, and puddings.
Comprised of: Water, Colour: Caramel III (150c); Salt, Preservative: Sodium Metabisulphite (223).

Now, Caramel III is a common beer coloring additive and is still used in the industrial brewing industry. However, if we wanted to add this quirky ingredient to our brewing recipe programs the problem arises of how to classify it and where to put it. So first, what are the specs on Caramel III?

Composition: Plain ammonia caramel, Class III
Appearance: Dark brown viscous liquid
Odour: Characteristic odour
Analysis
Colour (EBC): [approx.] 33,000
pH: 5
Extract (L°/kg): 245.1
Total Apparent Solids (%): 65.5
source: http://www.murphyandson.co.uk/datasheets/tech_caramel.pdf

How to use it?
It is used either in the copper, or in the fermenter, usually, but can also be used at conditioning to correct color, if needed. An addition of 6 ml per hectolitre will give an increase in colour of 2 EBC. As it is normally made by caramelizing sugar in the presence of ammonia, and should be listed as a Brewing Sugar or Adjunct in brewing programs.

Lastly, an issue I haven't yet been able to resolve, that is what is the dilution factor of Caramel III in Parisian Essence. As a first Guess based on the nutritional information, I'd say 10.2% Caramel III in water. This then begs the question, how does the colour impact change with dilution?By my reckoning this requires the addition of 58.82g per hectolitre to produce a 2 EBC increase in beer colour, or roughly 0,06ml of Parisian Essence per litre of wort. If I'm in error, please feel free to correct me.
source: http://www.queen.com.au/pantry-item/parisian-essence/

BTW, does anyone know how to convert LDK to Brewing Potential?

Cheers from an Aussie in Hamburg, Germany.
FB Group: Hobbybrau Hamburg.
 

fletcher

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TheTaxidermist said:
Hi guys my first post here. Just wanted to pick up something that got dropped along the way in the discussion above, "Parisian Essence." I figured after a bit of a lengthy search this was the best place to post the information I've gathered.


Queen Parisian Essence: Browning agent for browning gravies, soups, broths,beef tea, cakes, and puddings.
Comprised of: Water, Colour: Caramel III (150c); Salt, Preservative: Sodium Metabisulphite (223).

Now, Caramel III is a common beer coloring additive and is still used in the industrial brewing industry. However, if we wanted to add this quirky ingredient to our brewing recipe programs the problem arises of how to classify it and where to put it. So first, what are the specs on Caramel III?

Composition: Plain ammonia caramel, Class III
Appearance: Dark brown viscous liquid
Odour: Characteristic odour
Analysis
Colour (EBC): [approx.] 33,000
pH: 5
Extract (L°/kg): 245.1
Total Apparent Solids (%): 65.5
source: http://www.murphyandson.co.uk/datasheets/tech_caramel.pdf

How to use it?
It is used either in the copper, or in the fermenter, usually, but can also be used at conditioning to correct color, if needed. An addition of 6 ml per hectolitre will give an increase in colour of 2 EBC. As it is normally made by caramelizing sugar in the presence of ammonia, and should be listed as a Brewing Sugar or Adjunct in brewing programs.

Lastly, an issue I haven't yet been able to resolve, that is what is the dilution factor of Caramel III in Parisian Essence. As a first Guess based on the nutritional information, I'd say 10.2% Caramel III in water. This then begs the question, how does the colour impact change with dilution?By my reckoning this requires the addition of 58.82g per hectolitre to produce a 2 EBC increase in beer colour, or roughly 0,06ml of Parisian Essence per litre of wort. If I'm in error, please feel free to correct me.
source: http://www.queen.com.au/pantry-item/parisian-essence/

BTW, does anyone know how to convert LDK to Brewing Potential?

Cheers from an Aussie in Hamburg, Germany.
FB Group: Hobbybrau Hamburg.
bumping this as i'd like to know the answers to the quoted post also. am looking at some of the beers in bronzed brews which use parisian essence. they have the mLs of parisian essence to add but i'd like to know the colour when adding specific mLs to wort/beer.

anyone smarter than me know and/or what figures to enter it as an ingredient in beersmith?
 

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