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Australian Pale Ale

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jimmythehuman

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Ok i am new, go easy on me. My 3rd brew. 1st was the kit lager (clear and bubbly=success). 2nd is coopers IPA/Kit Converter. 3rd is going to some variation of the below and the 4th will be dark/brown ale.

I am hoping the below will end up being an Aussie Pale Ale, i used the spreadsheet and came up with the following (also based on finding ingredients that were affordable). Is the following like to produce a nice reasonably true pale ale.

21l
Black rock Unhopped Light 1.5kg
Light Dry Malt 1.0kg
Carapils .5kg steeped/sparged

Recipe Spreadsheet says, but it seems like a lot of hops to me?
Kent Goldings 20g @ 60min
Fuggles 20g @ 60min
Kent Goldings 30g @ 20min
US05 Yeast

Appreciate any advice or suggestions :)
 

tiprya

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What sort of Australian ale are you trying to make? Similar to a coopers? If you do a search there are some good coopers clone recipes.

Australian ale is a pretty broad style, and your recipe will make a nice beer.

The hops are british varieties but will be fine for bitttering and the small amount of hop flavour you'll get from the 20 minute addition.

US05 works fine in this type of beer, but if you're adventurous, you can reculture coopers yeast from a 6 pack and get something a bit more authentic.
 

mwd

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If you are after an authentic Australian Pale you really need Pride of Ringwood hops as well as the Coopers yeast.

Nothing wrong with that recipe though should make a tasty English Pale Ale
 

manticle

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Plug the aa values into the spreadsheet and find out the ibu level. At first glance the hops look ok but it depends on the aa, final volume and boil gravity as well as your desired outcome.

Not that aussie but looks like it will work ok.
 

Fish13

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From of my research lately for it be an Aussie ale. Its needs to be high og and burton style water and hops would be english variety.
 

QldKev

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That recipe is no Australian Pale Ale..

Try this
Halve the carapils
Piss of all the pommy hops (I love pommy hops but you want an Australian Pale Ale)
28g POR @ 60min
Harvest some CPA yeast from a bottle and grown it up.
Ferment at 16.5c

edit: Also talk to ekul, he is MR CPA and also has done extract brews.

QldKev
 

eamonnfoley

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Use the Coopers Australian Pale Ale kit (part of the International Series - available at Big W). including the yeast that comes with it also, unless you want to culture your own from the bottles.
 

Bribie G

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Culturing from the bottles is a must, to get the banana and pear esters that the style is famous for. Don't stint, Liquorland usually have 3 for $16 tall bottles which at 5.7% ABV gives you more bang for your buck than VB.

Drink the three - :icon_drunk: carefully decant - but tip the sediment into a sterilised jar or bottle as you go. Then make up some light dried malt extract to a litre with around 100g of LDME, tip in the sediment and let it ferment - could take three days for it to really kick off and it won't necessarily get a head on it. I use a little 4L pail with tight lid that I get from cheap shops. Garage temperature is good this time of year.

Then when it's fermented out (I normally find 4 days does it) you'll have a "slab" of yeast on the bottom - pour off the clear liquid on top, you don't want that in your brew - and use the yeast, it will go off like the clappers. If you like Banana, ferment over 20 and if you like pear, ferment below 20.

If it works out well then save the yeast cake in a PET in the fridge and you'll have yeast for next time without having to go through the bottle thing again. I find that second and third generations you really start to get the fruit esters happening.
 

DKS

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From of my research lately for it be an Aussie ale. Its needs to be high og and burton style water and hops would be english variety.
Burton style water... I dont follow. Could youfill me in on this fish? Are you suggesting Coopers use Burton on Trent water specs? Im going to make a sparkling soon.
Daz
 

kymba

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Burton style water... I dont follow. Could youfill me in on this fish? Are you suggesting Coopers use Burton on Trent water specs? Im going to make a sparkling soon.
Daz
they R/O their bore water so they could use any water profile they like

heres a pic from a few years ago of one of the ro banks, much like bribie's

PB040838__Large_.JPG

and ot but just coz, here is the mash filter, much like bribie's bagucket no?

PB040835__Large_.JPG PB040836__Large_.JPG
 

Fish13

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From my early searchs so far and this going back to the 1830's the beer was 1.080 and had burton on trent water. Although it was export from burton itself, they called it no.3 Australian ale. The other local brewies copied the same style. But from further reading the style itself is more ipa. Considering the time taken to reach our shores. So i think maybe coopers water could be based on it but i an making an assumption.
 

jimmythehuman

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Culturing from the bottles is a must, to get the banana and pear esters that the style is famous for. Don't stint, Liquorland usually have 3 for $16 tall bottles which at 5.7% ABV gives you more bang for your buck than VB.

Drink the three - :icon_drunk: carefully decant - but tip the sediment into a sterilised jar or bottle as you go. Then make up some light dried malt extract to a litre with around 100g of LDME, tip in the sediment and let it ferment - could take three days for it to really kick off and it won't necessarily get a head on it. I use a little 4L pail with tight lid that I get from cheap shops. Garage temperature is good this time of year.

Then when it's fermented out (I normally find 4 days does it) you'll have a "slab" of yeast on the bottom - pour off the clear liquid on top, you don't want that in your brew - and use the yeast, it will go off like the clappers. If you like Banana, ferment over 20 and if you like pear, ferment below 20.

If it works out well then save the yeast cake in a PET in the fridge and you'll have yeast for next time without having to go through the bottle thing again. I find that second and third generations you really start to get the fruit esters happening.
Shit. Today was meant to be an AFD.

OK so i have drank the coopers and preserved the bits in the bottom. I have light matl extract here. I am not sure i uderstand the difference between Light Malt Extract and LDME?

I am listeing to the other comments on beer style. I am not well versed enough to describe what i am trying to do. Does anyone know Mornington Pale Ale? That's what i want to replicate. I thought (maybe wrongley) that was an Aussie Pale ale.) drinking the coopers now, its very different...now i am confused...at least i hav beer.
 

DKS

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From my early searchs so far and this going back to the 1830's the beer was 1.080 and had burton on trent water. Although it was export from burton itself, they called it no.3 Australian ale. The other local brewies copied the same style. But from further reading the style itself is more ipa. Considering the time taken to reach our shores. So i think maybe coopers water could be based on it but i an making an assumption.

Naa...... I dont buy it. AFAIK very few English breweries used such hard water and for Coopers to add costly additives to their water to such a degree seems alittle askew.
I had two pale stubs on the week end and didnt pick a hint of realy hard water. You may well be right fish but it just doesnt gel with me and I cant recall ever hearing of it being suggested before. Happy to be corrected or persuaded though. Cheers.
Daz
 

DKS

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Add 100g dry malt extract to 1lt of water.
From memory this comes in somewhere around 1.040?
Can you do the same with dex or sugar?
I usually use saved wort but if stuck without would sugar work to make a starter on a stir plate.
Daz
 

manticle

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Better to feed yeast with malt rather that sucrose or dextrose.
 

tiprya

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Add the 100g of LDME to 1L of water, boil for 15 minutes, cool to room temp with something covering the opening - then swirl the yeast in the bottom of the bottles and pour them in.

Not sure how much yeast that will give you, or if you'll need to step up again (add more LDME + water) to get enough yeast to pitch.
 

jimmythehuman

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Thanks for the tips. I have done the yeast process and have 2 jars with the LDME and the yeast split between them (didnt have 1 good sized container).

this process has generated a lot of questions for me :)

Can i do this same process with the yeast cake at the bottom of a brew in the fermenter?
If i had dry hopped and had hops and stuff on the yeast cake would this matter or always use the muslin bag for hops when you wanna save the yeast.
How much yeast cake/slurry stuff do you use in a normal brew?
What will happen if i dont understand the yeast concentration in the cake and end up puting too much, will it just ferment quicker?
What do you people do with the yeast that comes with kits?
 

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