Aroma Sharing Between Headspace In Kegs

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jbowers

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Probably the stupidest thought ever, but something that just occurred to me. When releasing the pressure from a keg, burping co2 etc, the aroma of the beer is clearly present in there. When using line splitters, that co2, and thus that aroma, can travel freely from one keg to another (unless using nrv's at the end of every line splitter). Would this possibly cause the aromas from different kegs to contaminate one another?

Potentially a very stupid idea, but keen to hear some thoughts on this....
 

alfadog

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I'm thinking that since they are all at equal pressure the aromas would not travel too easily, maybe there is a slight tainting but noting that I have noticed
 

roller997

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Probably the stupidest thought ever, but something that just occurred to me. When releasing the pressure from a keg, burping co2 etc, the aroma of the beer is clearly present in there. When using line splitters, that co2, and thus that aroma, can travel freely from one keg to another (unless using nrv's at the end of every line splitter). Would this possibly cause the aromas from different kegs to contaminate one another?

Potentially a very stupid idea, but keen to hear some thoughts on this....
It would depend on the strength of the aroma of each beer and the pressure in the kegs. If one keg with a strong (possibly off) beer has greater pressure and is continuing to equalize with the other keg, there would be a chance that the second keg could retain some of these flavours.

I would suggest that usually the kegs would be fairly well balanced if you force carbonate the same way and ferment at similar finishing temperatures so this should rarely be noticable. I can't say that I have ever noticed any impact from one keg to another but then under the right circumstances I am sure it could happen.



Regards



Roller
 

wombil

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think you are right about that idea.Can't see too much aroma going back against the gas pressure to another keg or anywhere.
 

jbowers

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When I turn my valves off for a couple of days when going out, then come home and turn them back on, I sometimes hear gas being released when switching the second valve on. That has to mean gas is going from one to another. It's probably not going to affect the beer, but was just curious...
 

newguy

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Not a stupid question at all - a classical case of diffusion and it can travel "upstream". However, the chance of one keg contaminating another is quite small unless they're both hooked up for a long time - I'd guess many months.
 

humulus

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When I turn my valves off for a couple of days when going out, then come home and turn them back on, I sometimes hear gas being released when switching the second valve on. That has to mean gas is going from one to another. It's probably not going to affect the beer, but was just curious...
Was thinking exactly the same thing!i hear that same hissing sound,ive got a Belgian and a Pilsner through my splitters,2 different styles and tastes,be interesting to see if i can pick up anything,,,,,,now its been mentioned!
 

jbowers

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Was thinking exactly the same thing!i hear that same hissing sound,ive got a Belgian and a Pilsner through my splitters,2 different styles and tastes,be interesting to see if i can pick up anything,,,,,,now its been mentioned!
I swore I got some light phenolic notes in my English Pale last night - but I had JUST finished a glass of my belgian single... Probably all in my head. Or my beer has become infected <_<
 

kieran

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No return valves! From a physics perspective, it can happen. If it worries you, grab some and stop any mixing.
 

jbowers

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...meh

I can easily prevent it through clever use of the line splitter on/off switches.... Would rather than than spending nearly $120 to fix a problem I don't really have...
 

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