Arc Welding

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Green Iguana

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I have been trying to arc weld my metal frame together over the weekend. I have not done any welding before and it shows. The welds are very messy and break when i put force on them. The steel is 25mm SHS (galvanised). What I am doing wrong, i seem to be blowing a hole in the metal as I go along, does this mean the amp are too high? Please share your welding tips......

Cheers
 

Justin

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While I do not know how to weld (that's my Dad's job) and therefore have no real advice to offer, I have talked to and asked many welders about welding a frame out of RHS.

The concensus seems to be that's it can be a bit tricky to weld, mainly because the walls of the steel are relatively thin and hence you blow through very easily with an arc welder. A MIG is the preferred tool for nice clean welds from what I can make out. I'm sure others will add more advice but I don't think I would feel too downhearted at this stage. It's tricky stuff to learn on.

It's also a bit tough to get things square too unless you have clamps etc. The weld cools and contracts and pulls your frame out of square.

Good luck with it.
Cheers, Justin
 

Darren

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The galvanising is most probably causing most of your problems as it "burns". An angle grinder to remove most of it before you start to weld would help alot.
cheers
Darren
 

Fingerlickin_B

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Ok, Ill attempt to help you here (my descriptions may however be useless).

With steel like you are using the amps must be kept way down. Basically so low that its really, really easy for the electrode to stick to the job even if you arent applying downward movement.

The electrodes must be no thicker than the material to be joined (an electrode about 2/3 the wall thickness of the tubing would be optimum).

Make sure the electrodes you have purchased are correct for the material to be joined (read the packet)if they are old throw them out and buy new ones.

Every surface that is in any way associated with the welding must be cleaned of rust, paint, grease, etc and be clean bare metal (including the grounding clamp point).

Lay out a few practice pieces and do just thatpractice.

You need good penetration for it to stay together (deep red), but too much and youll blow holes.

The trick is to start off in one spot moving the electrode down on the joint and then start moving once it starts glowing red, all the time making sure not to move too fast or too slow.again, youll only get this down with practice.

Dont push on the electrode, just kind of let it pull itself (or fall) into the weld as it dissipates.

That should get you going in the right direction..if it made any sense :huh:

PZ.
 

Green Iguana

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Thanks, that is some good advice. I'll try it tonight.

Cheers
 

Jazman

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gi arc welding takes practice as the post before get the low electrode na d also it depend how thick th a material is
but first you must go from left to to right in the weld stroke if right handed and you need toclean the slag off.
but i would get a bit of scrap and practice then tack the job and do a few weld if not good grind it off but be aware the more u grind off the thinner the material is going to be and mig is easy but but practice before u make your frame as u need good strong welds.
 

Darren

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Jazman is right. If you have had a go at an area and it hasn't stuck, you will need to clean the "flux" and all the daggy welds off. A chipping tool and a wire brush will help.
I think the galv will be causing most of your problems. If all fails a drill and bolts is an easy option.
cheers
Darren
 

BoilerBoy

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Yep, Agree with Jazman and Darren If the steel is to thin and with galv it takes a higher amp to get through the galv for the weld to bond correctly, yet that will also cause holes. so clean off the galv from the area you want to weld first then you can use a lower amperage.

All the best
 

normell

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Get rid of as much Gal as possible, and make sure that the electrodes are completly DRY, if not put into a very low oven to dry them out.


Normell
 

Ducatiboy stu

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depending on the quality of the steel, the Gal-Zinc coating can be thick. best way is to grind some off, leave it for a day and if it shows signs of rust then you know that you have removed the gal plating.

Mkae sure that you clean the rust before welding...
 

tangent

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also....
mate, hot flux that you're chipping off is basically like red hot glass
it loves to fly straight into your eye, even from a distance whilst squinting
put some goggles on or sunnies or get the kids to do it
 

Shed

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I found using 'satincraft' rods made life a lot easier for me. I'm not sure what's different about them but, i found it made striking the arc and getting going much easier. They just seemed to not stick so easily.
These rods have a blue coloured flux coating.

Cheers,
Andy
 

timmy

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Ducatiboy stu said:
depending on the quality of the steel, the Gal-Zinc coating can be thick. best way is to grind some off, leave it for a day and if it shows signs of rust then you know that you have removed the gal plating.

Mkae sure that you clean the rust before welding...
[post="82034"][/post]​
Or just grind until you get sparks. The Gal won't spark with a grinder.
 

vlbaby

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Shed said:
I found using 'satincraft' rods made life a lot easier for me. I'm not sure what's different about them but, i found it made striking the arc and getting going much easier. They just seemed to not stick so easily.
These rods have a blue coloured flux coating.

Cheers,
Andy
[post="82046"][/post]​
Agree with this 100%!! Dont use cheap rods like bunnings or super cheap sell. The flux in these rods isnt as good, making for a more difficult weld. Use only quality rods.

vlbaby.
 

Beerpig

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Lots of advice here .................. even some good advice

First - chill 6 of your finest home brew

Second - Pick up the phone

Third - Call a friend, relative or aquaintance who is a Boilermaker or can well

Fourth - Be nice to them

Fifth - Drink said homebrews with your new found best mate while admiring your new stand

Cheers
 

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