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Any biltong makers out there?

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apoole

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Hi all,

Are there any biltong makers out there? I need some advice on a good drying set up - I live on the coast so need to be extra careful with the humidity changes.

Adam
 

brettprevans

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Theres a biltong and jerky thread in brew food section. Or search biltong or jerky. Quite a few makers out there. Great stuff.
 

brettprevans

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QldKev said:
There's a lot of us who make it. I also live next to the ocean and also in Queensland, so humidity it is for me, and I make it often.

http://aussiehomebrewer.com/topic/2577-a-beer-accompaniment/

http://aussiehomebrewer.com/topic/22350-jerky-sausage-making-cures-seasonings/



edit: This is what I've been running for the past about 7 years. Works a treat

biltong1.jpg
in all the biltong jerky threads I havent seen u post that pic. Show more pics so people can replicate. Or make a wiki.
 

QldKev

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citymorgue2 said:
in all the biltong jerky threads I havent seen u post that pic. Show more pics so people can replicate. Or make a wiki.
I'll try and get one up today

edit: Here it is
 

givemeamash

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made a pretty good one last week but I us a dehydrater, takes the risk out!!
 

Stagwa

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givemeamash said:
made a pretty good one last week but I us a dehydrater, takes the risk out!!
What risks are you talking about?
 

QldKev

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Mould is one issue, but the main issue from my understanding is the microbial pathogens, such as e.coli. But salami etc pose the same risks. A good dose or salt helps reduce a lot of issues. I've eaten it for many years and have not had an issue yet, touch wood. Just be careful in the preparation and keep the air moving during curing/drying. I always eat some 24 hours prior to giving it to younger/older people.
 

Stagwa

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Biltong is definitely air and hung dried, if you use a dehydrator it is more likely jerky. Mould is not an issue, if you see it wipe it off with a clean cloth and vinegar. If you are getting mould you don’t have sufficient air flow and humidity reduction in your drying cabinet. There is little or no risk if your meat is fresh and you are sanitary (like brewing) rotten meat smells like rotten meat and it will only rot if you **** it up.
With all due respect Kev, that is not a biltong cabinet but a version of a food dehydrator and the recipes in this link (http://aussiehomebrewer.com/topic/71586-biltong-drying-box/) are hybrid jerky and biltong but not biltong.
What’s the difference?
Biltong is spiced, flavoured, slow dried and cured dried meat – the meat s the hero!
Jerky is marinaded rapidly dried/slow cooked or smoked – the sauce/marinade hides the meat.
Cheers,
Stagwa
 

felten

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Do you have a recipe/method for traditional biltong then?

[ed] Serious question! ;)
 

benno1973

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QldKev said:
But salami etc pose the same risks.
I agree that the issues are pathogens, but just to clarify, salami is cured and dried at low temperatures (12C), while biltong (as I understand it) is at higher temperatures. Also, salami has the issue of grinding meat, where some pathogens (like C. botulinum) which are anaerobic, are taken from the exposed outer surface of the meat, minced and packed into the anaerobic interior in casings. So botulism would be a bigger issue for salami than biltong.
 

brettprevans

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Kaiser Soze said:
I agree that the issues are pathogens, but just to clarify, salami is cured and dried at low temperatures (12C), while biltong (as I understand it) is at higher temperatures. Also, salami has the issue of grinding meat, where some pathogens (like C. botulinum) which are anaerobic, are taken from the exposed outer surface of the meat, minced and packed into the anaerobic interior in casings. So botulism would be a bigger issue for salami than biltong.
correct which is why with homemade non heat treated salami they make the salamis thinner to help dry out the salami faster and not risk spoilage and botulism. there is a salami thread going into great detail on this if you want to read it.

as per my post above. plenty of biltong recipes and methods listed in the existing biltong and jerky threads
 

QldKev

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I'm not sure if there is a best temperature for biltong, all mine is done at room temp all year around. Up here our temperature is a lot different to down south (no kidding). My office is currently 26.1, and I just went and checked the carport 24.8c. I was told it was more important to keep the air moving than to worry about the temp by a friend who has spent many years in Africa.

Once I'm ready to keg the Berliner Weisse to free up the spare fridge, I'm going to try my hand at salami. Also got to buy a stc-1000 that can do humidity.
 

Stagwa

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felten said:
Do you have a recipe/method for traditional biltong then?

[ed] Serious question! ;)
Hi Felton and other meat eaters,

It’s pretty hard to come by “traditional” recipes as I have found the Afrikaners are very protective of their family recipe and method, believing it is the best because they have a special “secret” ingredient like a shot of brandy, a pinch of XXX etc. They would all be variations of a similar recipe.

Most of the Biltong available in Oz would not sell well in South Africa. If you want to make biltong that will taste like that which available in S.A. at most Biltong shops or butchers I would recommend trying one of the commercial spice mixes available in Oz, preferably one that comes from S.A. Once you have the “taste memory” you could work out your recipe from the basic one below. Personally I wouldn’t use the Springbok foods spice, too me the colour looks odd (compared to others I have used and seen) and it looks like there is fair amount of sugar in it, Springbok foods Biltong is rather different from what you would get in Biltong shop in SA.

The ideal Biltong is still soft inside, lightly salted and spiced with coriander to enhance the flavour of the meat. Try this recipe varying the amounts of salt, pepper and coriander until you find you happy place. After a few batches you will be able to make biltong by “feel”, this is a good starting point from an S.A. cookbook and the amount are approximate:

Ingredients:
2.5 KGs of fresh, good quality roasting meat – Silverside and Topside are my pick.
50 ml good quality salt
80 ml Coriander
15ml fleshly ground black pepper
Good quality vinegar – malt or red wine

Method:
  1. Dry roast the coriander lightly in a dry frypan, grind about 70% very fine and the remainder course – this is the most important flavour in biltong
  2. Remove all the fat off the meat – you can leave it on as it will also get flavoured and “cure” and is considered by many South Africans as essential and the best part, I don’t but I’m probably in the minority.
  3. Slice the meat with the grain into strips of about 2cms by 3 – 5 cms with practice you will find you happy place
  4. Layer the meat in you marinading dish (glass or plastic) sprinkle lightly with the vinegar and then the spices (salt, pepper, coriander) judge it so that you use the last of the spices on the last piece of meat
  5. Refrigerate for a day or over night turning and mixing the meat regularly so that it all marinades evenly
  6. Hang in your drying box
  7. Enjoy with you favourite homebrew

Tips:
Airflow and humidity reduction is very important as is keeping the flies away
Use good quality, fresh meat and ingredients for best results
Don’t over do the salt
Don’t overdo the vinegar; we are not trying to pickle the meat
If you need to store it then you are doing it wrong!!! It can be stored in the fridge in a zip lock bag with all air removed for a few days or frozen for ages – let it come to room temp before eating to get the best flavour.
Look on the internet for inspiration and recipes – the best recipes would follow a similar method.
Don’t tell your S.A. mates that you can make biltong until you can produce a shitload in 1 go!

Cheers,
Stagwa
 

robv

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QldKev said:
Mould is one issue, but the main issue from my understanding is the microbial pathogens, such as e.coli. But salami etc pose the same risks. A good dose or salt helps reduce a lot of issues. I've eaten it for many years and have not had an issue yet, touch wood. Just be careful in the preparation and keep the air moving during curing/drying. I always eat some 24 hours prior to giving it to younger/older people.
A teaspoon of bicarb in your spice blend prevents the mould quite well and does not affect the taste
 

robv

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Stagwa said:
Hi Felton and other meat eaters,

It’s pretty hard to come by “traditional” recipes as I have found the Afrikaners are very protective of their family recipe and method, believing it is the best because they have a special “secret” ingredient like a shot of brandy, a pinch of XXX etc. They would all be variations of a similar recipe.

Most of the Biltong available in Oz would not sell well in South Africa. If you want to make biltong that will taste like that which available in S.A. at most Biltong shops or butchers I would recommend trying one of the commercial spice mixes available in Oz, preferably one that comes from S.A. Once you have the “taste memory” you could work out your recipe from the basic one below. Personally I wouldn’t use the Springbok foods spice, too me the colour looks odd (compared to others I have used and seen) and it looks like there is fair amount of sugar in it, Springbok foods Biltong is rather different from what you would get in Biltong shop in SA.

The ideal Biltong is still soft inside, lightly salted and spiced with coriander to enhance the flavour of the meat. Try this recipe varying the amounts of salt, pepper and coriander until you find you happy place. After a few batches you will be able to make biltong by “feel”, this is a good starting point from an S.A. cookbook and the amount are approximate:

Ingredients:
2.5 KGs of fresh, good quality roasting meat – Silverside and Topside are my pick.
50 ml good quality salt
80 ml Coriander
15ml fleshly ground black pepper
Good quality vinegar – malt or red wine

Method:
  1. Dry roast the coriander lightly in a dry frypan, grind about 70% very fine and the remainder course – this is the most important flavour in biltong
  2. Remove all the fat off the meat – you can leave it on as it will also get flavoured and “cure” and is considered by many South Africans as essential and the best part, I don’t but I’m probably in the minority.
  3. Slice the meat with the grain into strips of about 2cms by 3 – 5 cms with practice you will find you happy place
  4. Layer the meat in you marinading dish (glass or plastic) sprinkle lightly with the vinegar and then the spices (salt, pepper, coriander) judge it so that you use the last of the spices on the last piece of meat
  5. Refrigerate for a day or over night turning and mixing the meat regularly so that it all marinades evenly
  6. Hang in your drying box
  7. Enjoy with you favourite homebrew

Tips:
Airflow and humidity reduction is very important as is keeping the flies away
Use good quality, fresh meat and ingredients for best results
Don’t over do the salt
Don’t overdo the vinegar; we are not trying to pickle the meat
If you need to store it then you are doing it wrong!!! It can be stored in the fridge in a zip lock bag with all air removed for a few days or frozen for ages – let it come to room temp before eating to get the best flavour.
Look on the internet for inspiration and recipes – the best recipes would follow a similar method.
Don’t tell your S.A. mates that you can make biltong until you can produce a shitload in 1 go!

Cheers,
Stagwa
Hi Stagwa
Plenty of commercially available biltong in S.E QLD that would rival anything in S.A
Rhodesians always made better biltong than South Africans anyway :p :ph34r:

Cheers
Rob
 

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