Help Support Aussie Homebrewer by donating:

  1. We have implemented the ability to gift someone a Supporting Membership now! When you access the Upgrade page there is now a 'Gift' button. Once you click that you can enter a username to gift an account Upgrade to. Great way to help support this forum plus give some kudos to anyone who has helped you.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Dismiss Notice

All grain small batch

Discussion in 'Welcome!' started by Kook beer, 11/10/19 at 11:59 AM.

 

  1. Kook beer

    New Member

    Joined:
    Thursday
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Australia
    Posted 11/10/19 at 11:59 AM
    Hi all,

    I’m giving all grain a go. I live in a unit so I will only be making 5 to 10 litre batches.

    Does anyone have any tips or advice for brewing all grain in small batches?

    Cheers,
     
  2. MHB

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    30/9/05
    Messages:
    5,404
    Likes Received:
    2,836
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Newcastle
    Posted 12/10/19 at 12:04 AM
    The processes are the same no matter what the batch size.
    What changes is your need for precision, if your strike water was a degree or two off in a 50L batch it would have 10 times the effect at 5L. I do a lot of 10L batches, and 200L batches so get to experience this pretty regularly.

    Make sure you have a good measuring jug (I use a 5L jug) and a good thermometer (I use a glass lab thermometer and not a crap one). The easiest way to start would be BIAB, get a pot at least twice the size of your batch (or close, the famous 19L pot is good).
    Plan, know your strike water temperature and volume, make sure you mash in just a touch under target then top up with a bit of boiling water to hit your targets. Same applies if you want to add hot water (boiling) to get to a mash out, do the calculation, add a bit less then adjust when its stabilised. Overshooting temperatures causes a lot more damage than does undershooting for a short time.

    Do simple beers for a start, something basic like a Coopers Pale Ale clone, if you make hop monsters from day one you wont be able to taste what you are getting from your grain bitt, there will be issues and you will need to learn how to get the most out of you malt.
    Personally I would be doing some SMASH (single malt and single hop) beers. Budvar, one of the finest pilsners in the world is made from one malt, one hop and one hop addition, I have always thought when you can brew that well it might be time to think about a second malt/hop/addition...
    Find a club or like where you can get your beers tasted critically, look for mistakes and learn how to fix them.
    I would do the same brew a couple (3) times in a row, gets you really familiar with your equipment and processes.

    Keep good records! Knowing what you have done and how the beer turns out helps you make the beers you want.
    Remember that making beer is easy, making really good beer consistently and repeatedly is bloody hard, it requires knowledge and control of your processes, fortunately its a bundle of fun - welcome aboard.
    Mark
     
    booyablack, trex_sami and philrob like this.
  3. Kook beer

    New Member

    Joined:
    Thursday
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Australia
    Posted 13/10/19 at 1:12 AM
    Hi Mark.

    Thanks for your detailed reply. I appreciate the advice.

    I definitely intend to do SMASH beers first up. I’ll probably start with a pale malt. Then try different malts like Pilsner, Vienna etc so I can figure out what I like.
    Can’t wait to get started. I’m sure my first batch will be a steep learning curve.

    I intend on mashing in by boil kettle. Is this advisable? Or would it be worth getting an esky to mash in for better insulation and temperature control?
     
  4. MHB

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    30/9/05
    Messages:
    5,404
    Likes Received:
    2,836
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Newcastle
    Posted 14/10/19 at 9:17 PM
    Start out with a recipe that is well tested, get it from someone you can trust (I use my local Brewman but there are plenty of good ones) to give you exactly what you need and to do it a couple of times, so you can do the same brew with the same ingredients.
    BIAB is about the lowest cost and technically easiest way to get started in AG. About all you need is your recipe, a pot, a bag, a thermometer and a measuring jug. Insulation needn't be more than an old towel. Read the guide to BIAB or google "brew in a bag" there are even YouTube videos out there.
    Keep it simple and repeatable.

    Ale malts are the easiest, Pilsner (or Pale) can require a bit more processing to get the most out of them, Vienna, Light and Dark Munich are base malts (you can use up to 100%) but I would recommend using them more like specialty malts until you have a lot more experience.

    Like any activity, getting the basics right at the start will take you 90% of the way, just get the basics right.
    Mark
     

Share This Page