Ag 2row To ? Oatmeal

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freezkat

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I am looking at doing my first AG. I am just shy of a full 25L batch using just 2row malt. I have 3.17 kg of 2row. I have an equal amount of oatmeal in stock. I am not computer savvy, so running an Excel ap would be more difficult than standing at a pot doing a biab, mash process.

to get an OG of 1.06 how much oatmeal could I use without having a gummy mess?

Any process/recipe suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thank You and Cheers

Bob
 

bradsbrew

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What style of beer are you looking at making?
 

MHB

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You dont have enough malt.
At 80% brewhouse efficiency using all of your base malt and an equal amount of oats (that would be brave) allowing a couple of litres for losses the best you would get is around 1.053.
You need to consider either getting more base malt (2 row) or making a smaller batch.
Personally I would be reluctant to use more than 10-15% Oats, some might go further. If you want to use a higher proportion of Oats you will need to do a Cereal or Adjunct Mash (as search should find plenty of info but the process in the BYO 250 Recipe book for Heineken is excellent).
A half size batch with the malt you have in hand and only about 500g of the Oats should put you somewhere around the 1.060 and should make a pretty decent beer.
MHB

PS
I appreciate the courtesy of putting your numbers in metric, around this part of the world all the malt is all 2 row, saying whether its Ale or Pilsner malt would be more useful, I assumed Pilsner for the above numbers, not that it would make a huge difference in this case.
M
 

freezkat

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You don't have enough malt.
At 80% brewhouse efficiency using all of your base malt and an equal amount of oats (that would be brave) allowing a couple of litres for losses the best you would get is around 1.053.
You need to consider either getting more base malt (2 row) or making a smaller batch.
Personally I would be reluctant to use more than 10-15% Oats, some might go further. If you want to use a higher proportion of Oats you will need to do a Cereal or Adjunct Mash (as search should find plenty of info but the process in the BYO 250 Recipe book for Heineken is excellent).
A half size batch with the malt you have in hand and only about 500g of the Oats should put you somewhere around the 1.060 and should make a pretty decent beer.
MHB

PS
I appreciate the courtesy of putting your numbers in metric, around this part of the world all the malt is all 2 row, saying whether it's Ale or Pilsner malt would be more useful, I assumed Pilsner for the above numbers, not that it would make a huge difference in this case.
M
I think it is pilsner also. As far as style of beer ...wet...fills a keg style

how about unmalted rye? i have a silo of that nearby.
 

MHB

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Mate beer is made from Malt anything else is just garnish no getting around it no short cuts and no real cheap substitutes unless you aim to make megaswill which is not why I brew.
Same processes apply to any unmalted adjunct as to Oats; the fact that I hate Rye makes me the wrong one to comment on that.
Malt makes good beer go buy some more malt.
M
 

katzke

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Mate beer is made from Malt anything else is just garnish no getting around it no short cuts and no real cheap substitutes unless you aim to make megaswill which is not why I brew.
Same processes apply to any unmalted adjunct as to Oats; the fact that I hate Rye makes me the wrong one to comment on that.
Malt makes good beer go buy some more malt.
M
A bit wrong there. A good Wit can be had with 50/50 malt and raw wheat.

As to Rye, it makes for a slick or greasy brew. Some like it some don't.

If you can get dry malt extract you could boost the gravity with that.

If you are up to an experiment you could use some oats, some rye, and the balance wheat to get an interesting if not odd beer. If you were not up to an experiment like that then a Wit would work if you have any raw wheat. You can even use the hot wheat cereal as long as it is just wheat and not any extra salt or preservatives. Wits are tart, some may say sour. I make one using either US-05 American yeast or have even used S04 English ale yeast.

You never mentioned Hops.
 

katzke

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PS
I appreciate the courtesy of putting your numbers in metric, around this part of the world all the malt is all 2 row, saying whether it's Ale or Pilsner malt would be more useful, I assumed Pilsner for the above numbers, not that it would make a huge difference in this case.
M
For the record in the USA, 2-row malt is basic pale malt. It is what we also refer to as base malt. Just a generic malt. It is what is used in any recipe unless something else is specified.
 

freezkat

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For the record in the USA, 2-row malt is basic pale malt. It is what we also refer to as base malt. Just a generic malt. It is what is used in any recipe unless something else is specified.
I made a partial based on Coopers Stout with Rye and Oatmeal. it is very good.

I looked up cereal Mashes and saw that rye doesn't need to be malted and doesn't need a protein rest.

My LHBS is over an hour drive @ 100KPH one way. I have an empty fermenter and keg. I'm willing to experiment.
 

Whiteferret

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I read somewhere that the americans grow a lot of 4 or 6 row malt (for other uses?) as well as 2 row.
 

freezkat

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I read somewhere that the americans grow a lot of 4 or 6 row malt (for other uses?) as well as 2 row.
6-row is readily available for sure. That needs a protein rest. 2-row is easier.

I'm just looking to make something to learn the process better. Not cost me any extra money as I am flat broke right now. And not have the beer kill me with too much starch or whatever. Whirfloc???
 

katzke

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6-row is readily available for sure. That needs a protein rest. 2-row is easier.

I'm just looking to make something to learn the process better. Not cost me any extra money as I am flat broke right now. And not have the beer kill me with too much starch or whatever. Whirfloc???
New brewers and experiments tend to fail. Look at this page for info on rye. http://www.brewingtechniques.com/library/b...1.3/hayden.html A bit more googling and you should get some more ideas.
 

freezkat

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Why worry? "A mash to gelatinize the grains usually isn't required for unmalted barley, wheat, or rye since the gelatization temperatures for these grains is within the same temperature range as the saccharification range of malted barley."
So a BIAB would less likely get stuck than a MLT?
 

katzke

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So a BIAB would less likely get stuck than a MLT?
I have done BIAB with 100% wheat malt and no stuck mash. I have done Wits with 50/50 malt and raw wheat with no problems. It may take a bit longer to drain the bag but not any issue.

If you have concerns do a 90 minute mash and don't forget the mash out. May want to read about rye and odd flavors with too high a mash out temp.
 

freezkat

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Ok this is what I have in the Corona Mill.

I have had a Smoked Roggen before, and it was delicious. I think it was either a Schneider or Schlgl

1.814Kg (4 LB) American 2-row
1.36Kg (3 LB) raw Minnesota Rye (talk about green..it traveled less than a 1/4 mile)
.45Kg (1lb) German Melanoid
.45Kg (1lb) American Cherry-wood Smoke
.45Kg (1lb) American Caramel 40L

That's only 4.54Kg (10 lbs) of grain. What do you think I should do? I have a lot more rye. (Wow was it sticky through my corona)

1 Liter per 500g of grain for the mash?

What yeast and hops should I use?

Would any of these work I have in stock?:

Safbrew T-33 and T-58, Brewferm Lager and some wine yeast, (note: it is getting really cool in the cellar)

60g Williamette, 30g Columbus, 30g Galena, 30g Citra

I was thinking of doing a 2 pot stove-top BIAB. I don't have a MLT set up yet.

I have a big canning pot (30L) that will boil the whole batch. Then I have a smaller aluminum that is around 20L total.

I saw one of the AHBers used a couple grids to squeeze out his BIABs. I think I will employ that bit of genius. I imagine it would improve efficiency

So I am fairly daunted with the mash in/out, strike, rest and all that other info of when and where. Is there a sure-fire method of doing this? Just for cranking all that through the corona I don't want to have wasted my time. I'm not afraid of the flavor. The whole idea was to use rye grain from our farm
 

super_simian

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Willamette would be good; do you know the AA%? And how cold is cold? Below 15C (59F) you will need to use the Lager yeast, but I like the sound of raw rye and either S-33 or T-58. Peppery!
 

freezkat

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Willamette would be good; do you know the AA%? And how cold is cold? Below 15C (59F) you will need to use the Lager yeast, but I like the sound of raw rye and either S-33 or T-58. Peppery!
It was 15C on the floor last week (17C up on the bench). At the coldest it gets to 13C on the floor.

BTW... This past couple days outside -14C.

I just started an ale a week and a half ago using Coopers. At 17C it started very very slow. It is still in the primary. I like to wait for the scum to drop before racking to the secondary.


from freshhops.com
Willamette Acid range (Alpha %) 4-6% The king of aroma hops in the U.S. with its modest bittering value and the joyous harmony of flowers, fruit, earth and spice. Best suited for American Pale and Brown Ales, English-style Ales
Is this my Recipe in caveman measurements?

Boilmash.JPG
 

the_new_darren

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Mate beer is made from Malt anything else is just garnish no getting around it no short cuts and no real cheap substitutes unless you aim to make megaswill which is not why I brew.
Same processes apply to any unmalted adjunct as to Oats; the fact that I hate Rye makes me the wrong one to comment on that.
Malt makes good beer go buy some more malt.
M
You are joking MHB that you dont like rye in beer?

I have tried some rye beers from brewers here in Radelaide and they were fantastic!!

Go with the columbus and citra.

Yeast: F%ck knows, never used any of them (chose one to suit your ferment temps)

cheers

tnd
 

freezkat

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Back to the "Why Rye?"

The rye is free
It came from my back yard
There is a neat nostalgic feeling of making something from the land I live and work on.
I like some roggen beers.

Back to the topic...
I don't know if I should drop out the oats. I have 70% malted grains so far. A pound of rolled oats wouldn't gum anything up. I should have diastolic power to spare.

To be more traditional, I should go with the yeast that is best suited for the season. I am going to use the Brewferm Lager. Should I do a mini-mash to make a starter first? Or just use some LME?
 
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