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Advice Please - Crush The Oats?

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Brewer_010

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I'm putting ~10% oats into a stout (next weekish) and have flaked oats to use - do I run these through the mill with the rest of the grain or leave as is?

Thinking that it makes sense to crush, otherwise it will be a frikken mess, but on the other hand...??

Thanks in advance!
 

rosswill

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No need to crush flaked oats. Strait into the mash.
 

QldKev

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tha nor haw you make porridge B)

Yep, just chuck them in for a nudee swim
 

wessmith

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I'm putting ~10% oats into a stout (next weekish) and have flaked oats to use - do I run these through the mill with the rest of the grain or leave as is?

Thinking that it makes sense to crush, otherwise it will be a frikken mess, but on the other hand...??

Thanks in advance!
I would run the flaked (rolled) oats through the mill a couple of times and keep separate. Soak overnight in cold water then gelatinise offline (in a pot) before adding to the main mash. You will need about 5 ltrs/kg total of water to do this. The end result will be better conversion as much of the flaked oats product has been poorly converted/gelatinised in manufacture. Just think about making porridge!

Wes
 

jyo

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I would run the flaked (rolled) oats through the mill a couple of times and keep separate. Soak overnight in cold water then gelatinise offline (in a pot) before adding to the main mash. You will need about 5 ltrs/kg total of water to do this. The end result will be better conversion as much of the flaked oats product has been poorly converted/gelatinised in manufacture. Just think about making porridge!

Wes
I'm going to try this method next time and see how it goes.

Cheers.
 

manticle

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I would run the flaked (rolled) oats through the mill a couple of times and keep separate. Soak overnight in cold water then gelatinise offline (in a pot) before adding to the main mash. You will need about 5 ltrs/kg total of water to do this. The end result will be better conversion as much of the flaked oats product has been poorly converted/gelatinised in manufacture. Just think about making porridge!

Wes
I've only ever used Simpsons golden naked which I toast lightly then run through a mill. My understanding is that the GN oats are crystal oats so presumably have already been gelatinised.

Firstly is this correct?

Secondly, if I were to use flaked, raw or rolled oats in a future brew, at what temp would I be gelatinising them and do I need surplus enzymes/high diastatic base malt to convert them and/or a cereal mash?

Cheers
 

mje1980

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I would run the flaked (rolled) oats through the mill a couple of times and keep separate. Soak overnight in cold water then gelatinise offline (in a pot) before adding to the main mash. You will need about 5 ltrs/kg total of water to do this. The end result will be better conversion as much of the flaked oats product has been poorly converted/gelatinised in manufacture. Just think about making porridge!

Wes

Wes, does this do anything for head retention? I made an oatmeal stout, and the head, and retention was non existant. I thought it weird because i have heard good things about oats and smooth mouthfeel and head retention
 

seemax

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Done several stouts using cheapo quick oats ... slow roasted in the oven at 100C until brown and biscuity ... then straight in the mash.. has worked well.
 

Bribie G

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Supermarket oats contain a fair amount of oils which could kill head retention. Oatmeal stout is a bit like Milk Stout, sounds great but it was really only an advertising gimmick - probably put one oat in the mash.

Similar urban myths: use peated malt for smoky genuine Scottish ales.

bullshit, totally fabricated nonsense - that's coming from a drinker of many Scots beers in their native land.

However if you want to use anything flaked in a stout, recommend flaked barley.
 

Brewer_010

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Supermarket oats contain a fair amount of oils which could kill head retention. Oatmeal stout is a bit like Milk Stout, sounds great but it was really only an advertising gimmick - probably put one oat in the mash.

Similar urban myths: use peated malt for smoky genuine Scottish ales.

bullshit, totally fabricated nonsense - that's coming from a drinker of many Scots beers in their native land.

However if you want to use anything flaked in a stout, recommend flaked barley.
Interesting point about the oats, I have read and heard about silky smoothness from oats in a stout however I've never had a commercial example. May go to Plonk and find one to try out.
 

Brewer_010

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Done several stouts using cheapo quick oats ... slow roasted in the oven at 100C until brown and biscuity ... then straight in the mash.. has worked well.
thanks seemax - does the toasty flavour come through well?
 

tommygun

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Similar urban myths: use peated malt for smoky genuine Scottish ales.

bullshit, totally fabricated nonsense - that's coming from a drinker of many Scots beers in their native land.

Islay Scottish ale....
 

Bribie G

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Islay Scottish ale....
I said genuine Scots Ales as a style. Newcomers such as Swamp Head Brewery are not necessarily traditional, and probably strive not to be. Next season they could well bring out a chilli Scots curry ale, the noo.

Anyway, off topic for oats, just having a slag off at the usually American-origin so called "lost beers that need to be resurrected" - many of which never existed in the first place.

Anyone for a cock ale?
 

Online Brewing Supplies

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I said genuine Scots Ales as a style. Newcomers such as Swamp Head Brewery are not necessarily traditional, and probably strive not to be. Next season they could well bring out a chilli Scots curry ale, the noo.

Anyway, off topic for oats, just having a slag off at the usually American-origin so called "lost beers that need to be resurrected" - many of which never existed in the first place.

Anyone for a cock ale?
I believe jyo would like the COCK ale.
Nev
 

jyo

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I believe jyo would like the COCK ale.
Nev
I believe I'll try anything once...in a beer ;)

I've made a few (only 3 to be exact, so no guru) oatmeal stouts and I used between 6 and 8 percent toasted oats straight in the mash. Never had any problems with head retention. If I could make one half as good as Samuel Smiths I'd be a happy man. Time to get one ready for winter I think!
 

Spork

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My version. Not bad IISSMS


My fave oatmeal stout.


I mill the flaked oats. I don't think I need to, but they are in the bucket with the rest of the grain bill, so through they go.
 

Dave70

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I'm putting ~10% oats into a stout
I used half that last weekend and it stuck to buggery. Was probably more to do with my 'yeah, that's long enough' approach to mashing out, but give that grain bed plenty of time to settle followed by a slow drain would be my suggestion.

Some say a bad brewer blames his grist. I say its a victimless crime.
 

wessmith

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I've only ever used Simpsons golden naked which I toast lightly then run through a mill. My understanding is that the GN oats are crystal oats so presumably have already been gelatinised.

Firstly is this correct?

Secondly, if I were to use flaked, raw or rolled oats in a future brew, at what temp would I be gelatinising them and do I need surplus enzymes/high diastatic base malt to convert them and/or a cereal mash?

Cheers
Manticle, Simpsons GN is indeed a crystal malt and should be used as you would any other crystal grain. It is not only gelatinised but is converted as well.

Flaked or rolled oats and barley have been partially modified in the production process and theoretically can be added directly into the mash. The problem is that much of the product around in the local retail market has not been prepared specifically for brewing and varies dramatically in the degree of modification. Hence the suggestion to soak and pre-gelatinise. Both oats and barley will gelatinise at around 65C but it does no harm to use 70 to 75C while stirring vigorously to stop the "porridge" catching on the pot bottom. I would go for Simpsons or TF flaked products by preference.

All local malts have heaps of diastatic power and even the English floor malted higher colour malts (MO, Halcyon, GP) will easily handle 10% unmalted adjunct.

Wes
 

wessmith

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Wes, does this do anything for head retention? I made an oatmeal stout, and the head, and retention was non existant. I thought it weird because i have heard good things about oats and smooth mouthfeel and head retention
mje1980, how much % of the grist was FO? Was it a brewing product?

Wes
 

mje1980

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Sorry wes, it was plain old rolled oats from woollies, and around 10%.
 
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