Acid additions to water

Discussion in 'Water' started by Bonenose, 13/11/17 at 6:16 PM.

 

  1. Bonenose

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    Posted 13/11/17 at 6:16 PM
    Hi all,

    Have ventured into the world of water treatment a few brews ago and was wondering about acid additions. Is there any guidelines on what acid to use for mash and what to use for sparge water. Have been using lactic for mash water and citric or phosphoric, now that I have some, for sparge water. Using lactic for mash as I believe I read somewhere it occurs naturally in grain to a certain degree anyway. Then using citric or phosphoric simply to limit the amount of lactic I am using. Would welcome any feedback on preference or if there is anything I need to be aware of here.

    Cheers
     
  2. manticle

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    Posted 13/11/17 at 8:28 PM
    Phosphoric and/or lactic are my preferred.
    Hopefully you don't need so much of either that the flavour is detectable. Working out how much though depends entirely on mash pH, water pH and mineral content.

    You should get a report from local water authority or get an analysis if using tank/etc. If using RO, treat minerals as minimal and just measure mash and water pH. Then use brun, ez or similar, or work out yourself using formulae. Calcium and magnesium salt additions will affect pH too.
     
  3. Bonenose

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    Posted 13/11/17 at 9:37 PM
    Using brewers friend water calculator for quantities etc. and luckily have a water resources test bore a couple hundred meters from mine so no worries with water reports. Was just curious if it made any difference what acid I use for what. Most I have used is 4.5ml of lactic in mash so I presume these are not huge quantities.
     
  4. manticle

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    Posted 13/11/17 at 9:47 PM
    Your palate will ultimately be your guide. Get mash pH and calcium levels right, flavour salts as appropriate and sparge water to <6 with either acid. See how you like the results.
     
  5. nosco

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    Posted 14/11/17 at 2:40 AM
    JZ on the Brew Strong podcast said that lactic is like fruit juice and phosphoric is like soft drink in flavour. I havnt tested that theory myself so I cant confirm.
     
  6. Coodgee

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    Posted 14/11/17 at 2:47 AM
    really that's interesting. I quite like the 4 pines summer ale for it's soft-drink-like refreshing mouthfeel and flavour. I have been wondering how to create that in my beer. maybe I should switch from lactic to phosphoric and give it a go.
     
  7. Dave70

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    Posted 14/11/17 at 5:27 AM
    Acidulated malt?
     
  8. Coodgee

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    Posted 14/11/17 at 5:28 AM
    that's just essentially lactic acid though right?
     
  9. manticle

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    Posted 14/11/17 at 5:47 AM
    And it's a bit weird in sparge water
     
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  10. rude

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    Posted 14/11/17 at 5:56 AM
    Acid malt is good in the mash though
    R/O water for the sparge then you don't need to treat it
     
  11. Jack of all biers

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    Posted 14/11/17 at 11:29 AM
    There is lots you should be aware of. I suggest educate yourself about it first hand. First go to the free source at Brun water to learn some of the basics. Then when you can afford $23.47 for a book delivered to you door, buy the Water book by Palmer/Kaminski and you won't be disappointed. It will explain the advantages and disadvantages and why Phosphoric 'can' reduce calcium, but also why it doesn't if you use if properly. It sounds like you are on the right track, so for very little, but for a bit of light reading, you can get the benefit of some research and experience from some of the most respected minds in brewing (AJ deLange for starts).
     
  12. Bonenose

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    Posted 14/11/17 at 9:20 PM
    Cheers, will check it out
     

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