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S.E

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The yeast rises to 18 C slowly It isn't plunged into the spent grain at 60 C as you are trying to make out, again, I have done this twice, carefully monitored the temperature both times have been successful.
As I understand it from this and your first post you used the heat radiating from the grain bed to bring the yeast slowly up to pitching temp on a cold day in Melbourne , is that right?

I don’t see a problem with that but I’m with Markbeer in that it is far from the most sanitary place to be placing your yeast bottle or anything that’s going near the fermenter.

In cold weather I either put the yeast in the fermenting fridge with the heater set to 18c while I’m brewing or slowly add chilled wort a little at a time from the fermenter tap till it’s warm enough to pitch.
 
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My usual MO is to take the yeast out of the fridge and into the fermenting room the day before which is at a constant 18 C. I have an extremely sick wife who is going through chemo and I cannot plan when I can brew. I just have to seize the moment. The container does have an airtight seal, and I did wash it before opening it.
Today I do have a chance to brew again and I will be trying the onemorecell method of straight out the fridge and into the wort.
 

Grmblz

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Gone are the days when yeast was yeast and the only choice was ale or lager, and we knew exactly how to treat them and what to do with them.
Depending on the manufacturer we hydrate with varying temps or do not hydrate and just pitch, some recommend a starter whilst others forbid it, and that's just the dried stuff.
If 12 months ago you had suggested pitching into a 39c wort I would have thought your penthouse tenant was defective, and yet here I am doing just that, ok 35c I just can't bring myself to go the extra 4c, one day though.
So there you have it, all the old rules of thumb, conventional wisdoms, have changed or are changing, keep an open mind and try it, if it works for you then great and if it doesn't then I hope it was a pilot batch. Cheers G
 

sponge

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I like to make starters on a stir plate, stepped up to volume where necessary, in low gravity wort, at temperatures which encourage healthy yeast growth.

Potato, potata.
 

philrob

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I'm sticking with proven methods. Why change?
Experimenting with silly ideas is not for me.
 

Grmblz

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I'm sticking with proven methods. Why change?
Experimenting with silly ideas is not for me.
What proven methods do you refer to? Who proved them and when? Why change? Well for the luddites amongst us if we didn't we'd still be living in caves dressed in dead animal skins but I assume you refer to my post about yeast in the 21st century, well the product has changed, read my post carefully. New/different manufacturing/packaging methods, different suppliers now recommend different methods for pitching, are you suggesting we ignore Chris White when he recommends this https://www.whitelabs.com/resources/homebrew-starter-tips of course not, but then we get this from Fermentis (safale for the less well informed)
"TODAY A STUDY DEMONSTRATES THAT THE USE OF ACTIVE DRY YEASTS (ADY) is very
easy and does not necessarily include a rehydration step. To the contrary, the
ADY can advantageously be immediately put in contact with the wort into the
fermentation vessel (direct pitch). Several rehydration and direct pitch conditions
do not show any significant differences in terms of the viability and the
vitality of the ADY. This concept is protected under the E2UTM umbrella."
WOW! New technology, run for the hills chicken little the sky is falling.
Others actively discourage starters with their yeasts presumably due to their production methods, I'm not going to spoon feed you, I'm sure you've worked out how to use that silly experiment from 1991.
For those interested in progress and silly ideas https://www.theyeastbay.com/brewers-yeast-products/sigmunds-voss-kveik yep 38c pitching temp, I've got 2 other strains that I'm playing with, one is an isolate (Loki) the other a 3 strain mix, it really puts the cat amongst the pigeons style wise, but 3 day ferments and very drinkable after another 3 days, a true one week turn around on grav's North of 1050 please excuse my language but this shit is insane. A quiet warning to those scared of change "stay away from it and be very afraid" Cheers G
 

Timbo

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My usual MO is to take the yeast out of the fridge and into the fermenting room the day before which is at a constant 18 C. I have an extremely sick wife who is going through chemo and I cannot plan when I can brew. I just have to seize the moment. The container does have an airtight seal, and I did wash it before opening it.
Today I do have a chance to brew again and I will be trying the onemorecell method of straight out the fridge and into the wort.
Sorry to hear about your wife mate. Wishing her and yourself all the best!
 

hoppy2B

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The re-hydration temps for dry yeast are usually something like 35 degrees C. I assume the manufacturer has done testing and knows what they're talking about. But contrary to what is written on the packaging, I have used dry wine yeast from a packet that was opened years earlier, was not stored in a fridge and worked fine. So who knows what to believe.

People on this thread are claiming all sorts of things as best practice and making no reference to scientific data or anecdotal evidence, and therefore might as well be pissing into the wind.

And to top it off, pasteurization temps for milk (from wiki) are 30 minutes at 63 degrees C, and 15 seconds at 72 degrees C. Take from that what you will.

I hope your wife is good and well soon wide eyed and legless.
 
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I don't mind taking risks, especially if the risks are in my favour a guy who has done this for 40 years, and has done it without changing his method I figure it can't be too bad. He is in the UK his name is Mike Challis, he is now 85 years old still brewing 100 litre batches, the DVD he sent me shows him brewing in 1990 on a set up which a lot of home brewers would be more than happy with today.

I have asked him why he doesn't put his video on you tube, but he says he doesn't know how, and he doesn't like putting his head above the trenches. He got in touch with me about saving the co2 from the fermentation he does the same thing for keeping his casks connected to his beer engine and using his Noddy balloon connected to a cask breather. I think that was what he meant by keeping his head below the trenches he has had a few run ins with CAMRA.

As Grmblz has mentioned dry yeast has really changed a lot, no need to aerate wort, no need to re-hydrate, the Chinese English Ale yeast I have been using says to re hydrate but do not aerate the wort.

So anyone who is interested in Mikes DVD it is pretty long but interesting, I will post it out at no cost and maybe pass it around, I wouldn't like to go against his wishes and upload it, even if I new how.

Thanks for the messages for my wife, we were only reading on Saturday how cancer goes un diagnosed by doctors. She has had a pain in her side for about 6 months, she does yoga goes to the gym, and swims. It wasn't until we were in New York in May when I noticed she could not keep up walking and struggled with the sub way steps. The doctors had told her the pain in her side was muscle pain. We went back to the doctors and asked for a ultra sound, which led to a CT scan, which led to a PET scan and she was diagnosed with 4th stage mantle lymphoma. It is in her pelvis, rib, spleen, bone marrow and numerous lymph nodes.
She is going through aggressive chemo and immunotherapy I took her into Epworth Hospital yesterday and the treatment is over 2 days.
 

hoppy2B

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And to top it off, pasteurization temps for milk (from wiki) are 30 minutes at 63 degrees C, and 15 seconds at 72 degrees C. Take from that what you will.
Correction, those temperatures came from Britannica. com

Yeah, sorry to hear about your wife weal.
 

Coalminer

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onemorecell

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Thanks for the messages for my wife, we were only reading on Saturday how cancer goes un diagnosed by doctors. She has had a pain in her side for about 6 months, she does yoga goes to the gym, and swims. It wasn't until we were in New York in May when I noticed she could not keep up walking and struggled with the sub way steps. The doctors had told her the pain in her side was muscle pain. We went back to the doctors and asked for a ultra sound, which led to a CT scan, which led to a PET scan and she was diagnosed with 4th stage mantle lymphoma. It is in her pelvis, rib, spleen, bone marrow and numerous lymph nodes.
She is going through aggressive chemo and immunotherapy I took her into Epworth Hospital yesterday and the treatment is over 2 days.
sorry to hear that... sounds rough. Good luck mate and really hope it goes well!
 

hoppy2B

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Definitely the manufacturer knows what they are talking. Fermentis does not recommend these sort of temperatures and I think they supply a fair amount of yeast
eg Safale US-05... 25>29 https://fermentis.com/en/fermentation-solutions/you-create-beer/safale-us-05/
Saflager S=189... 15>25 https://fermentis.com/en/fermentation-solutions/you-create-beer/saflager-s-189/

Note these refers to E2U dry yeast so not outdated

Look before you leap
[/QUOTE]

I have a packet of Nottingham, albeit slightly out of date, which has a picture showing to rehydrate in 100 mL of water at 30-35 degrees C.

But if you have different information that is fair enough.
 

billygoat

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I don't mind taking risks, especially if the risks are in my favour a guy who has done this for 40 years, and has done it without changing his method I figure it can't be too bad. He is in the UK his name is Mike Challis, he is now 85 years old still brewing 100 litre batches, the DVD he sent me shows him brewing in 1990 on a set up which a lot of home brewers would be more than happy with today.

I have asked him why he doesn't put his video on you tube, but he says he doesn't know how, and he doesn't like putting his head above the trenches. He got in touch with me about saving the co2 from the fermentation he does the same thing for keeping his casks connected to his beer engine and using his Noddy balloon connected to a cask breather. I think that was what he meant by keeping his head below the trenches he has had a few run ins with CAMRA.

As Grmblz has mentioned dry yeast has really changed a lot, no need to aerate wort, no need to re-hydrate, the Chinese English Ale yeast I have been using says to re hydrate but do not aerate the wort.

So anyone who is interested in Mikes DVD it is pretty long but interesting, I will post it out at no cost and maybe pass it around, I wouldn't like to go against his wishes and upload it, even if I new how.

Thanks for the messages for my wife, we were only reading on Saturday how cancer goes un diagnosed by doctors. She has had a pain in her side for about 6 months, she does yoga goes to the gym, and swims. It wasn't until we were in New York in May when I noticed she could not keep up walking and struggled with the sub way steps. The doctors had told her the pain in her side was muscle pain. We went back to the doctors and asked for a ultra sound, which led to a CT scan, which led to a PET scan and she was diagnosed with 4th stage mantle lymphoma. It is in her pelvis, rib, spleen, bone marrow and numerous lymph nodes.
She is going through aggressive chemo and immunotherapy I took her into Epworth Hospital yesterday and the treatment is over 2 days.
What sort of stuff is on the video?
Very sorry to hear about your wife. I hope things get better.
 
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