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2 Fermenters side by side - different temp? Why?

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New_guy

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Hi
I have a batch of oatmeal stout and a batch of apple cider fermenting currently.

Stout:
Fresh wort kit from Grain and Grape
Wyeast 1084
Total volume 20lt in 30lt fermenter

Cider
10.5lt of cloudy apple juice from supermarket
S-04 Yeast
Total volume 10.5lt in 17lt fermenter

The fermenters are sitting side by side on a table in an air conditioned room.

Stout: 22 deg Celsius
Cider: 20 deg Celcius

I also just had to rig up a blow off valve for the stout as airlock was empty

Any info greatly appreciated

Thanks
 

jammer

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Fermentation generates heat. The extra volume in the fv will be the cause of the extra couple of degrees.
 

Bribie G

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In any case the stout is going mental which would add a couple of degrees in its own right. In old style breweries that used big square fermenting tanks they had to run refrigeration pipes through the brew to carry the heat away.

Off topic but I believe this is one of the main causes of new kit brewers getting the kit twang. They follow Coopers advice, pitch at 23 in the laundry then before they know it the brew is 27. Sad.
 

Econwatson

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I still dont understand why on earth they have 27 within their acceptable range. Surely lower temperatures are in most people's grasp, why not just set a lower temp? It will mean people enjoy the beer they brew more and are more likely to buy more kits!
 

Bribie G

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Sorry for hijack but it amazes me that the HB companies haven't woken up to themselves. I ran a LHBS in Maryborough QLD over 30 years ago and the common consensus was that April to October was far too cold for brewing because Coopers tells us so :unsure: :unsure: :unsure:

And we are talking South to Central QLD here.

Ah, October on the way - betta get some kits in, gonna be cranking out a batch every 4 days.

So there was (and still is by the looks of it) the major kit supplier in the world basically putting people off buying their product for the six months of the year which are really the golden months. Fecking unbelievable.
 

New_guy

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Bribie G said:
In any case the stout is going mental which would add a couple of degrees in its own right. In old style breweries that used big square fermenting tanks they had to run refrigeration pipes through the brew to carry the heat away.

Off topic but I believe this is one of the main causes of new kit brewers getting the kit twang. They follow Coopers advice, pitch at 23 in the laundry then before they know it the brew is 27. Sad.
Hi Bribie G,

When you say the stout is going mental - as in a good way or a bad way?
They are both at the same temp today as when started - 22 for the stout - do you think this is to high?
The cider as an almost continuos rolling bubble coming out of the airlock but it hasn't emptied the airlock once which I don't understand - sitting at 20.

thanks
 

New_guy

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Econwatson said:
I still dont understand why on earth they have 27 within their acceptable range. Surely lower temperatures are in most people's grasp, why not just set a lower temp? It will mean people enjoy the beer they brew more and are more likely to buy more kits!
I agree but in summer without a fridge it can be challenging to get 20 deg constant for a week plus, but I have not had it go above 22 - they are in the living room on the table - right in front of air con.
 

jammer

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New_guy said:
Hi Bribie G,

When you say the stout is going mental - as in a good way or a bad way?
They are both at the same temp today as when started - 22 for the stout - do you think this is to high?
The cider as an almost continuos rolling bubble coming out of the airlock but it hasn't emptied the airlock once which I don't understand - sitting at 20.

thanks
It'll be fine.
Stout is a couple of degrees higher than ideal, but you can get away with it. The style is a little bit forgiving.
The cider has more activity because the yeast convert the simple sugars in the apple juice quickly and easily, whereas the maltose in beer take a bit more effort.
Bet you the stout turns out fine.
 

Bribie G

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22 should be fine for a stout, what yeast did you use? Some yeasts which are "bred" for stouts such as the liquid Irish Ale yeasts work happily up to 24. Kit yeasts or dry yeasts such as S-04 or US-05 shouldn't throw any bad off flavours at 22.
 

New_guy

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Bribie G said:
22 should be fine for a stout, what yeast did you use? Some yeasts which are "bred" for stouts such as the liquid Irish Ale yeasts work happily up to 24. Kit yeasts or dry yeasts such as S-04 or US-05 shouldn't throw any bad off flavours at 22.
It's wyeast 1084 - Irish Ale wyeast site says can handle 16 - 22 with "fruit and complex esters above 18" - fingers crossed!
 

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