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1272 Or 1056 For An Apa

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JasonY

The Imperial Metric Brewery
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Personally I prefer 1272 (have 40L on the go now :p). I know that Guest Lurker did a split batch which a number of us tried. I think the opinions differed. From memory the 1272 was clearer. 1272 will give you a more fruity profile which I like in combination with lots a cascades.

Anyway my vote goes for 1272.
 

Jazman

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sorry cant help i have used 1056 which is good i have got a sample of 1272 but i have also used the 1728,(scottish) which was good and now got one with the 1028 in the fermetor but so far that is good but a neutral yeast will work fine but the 1272 is spos to be more fuiter i think jayse prefers the 1272
 

GMK

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my vote goes for 1272 as well - just do a diacetyl rest for 2-3 days prior to CCing in the fridge for a min of 2 preferably 4 weeks.

use some amarillo and a little chinook - goes really well.
 

Gulf Brewery

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GMK said:
my vote goes for 1272 as well - just do a diacetyl rest for 2-3 days prior to CCing in the fridge for a min of 2 preferably 4 weeks.
[post="57072"][/post]​
GMK

What effect is a diacetyl rest going to have on a beer fermented at ale temperatures? You raise the temperature with lager yeasts to assist in the removal of diacetyl. An ale yeast should be fermented at around the same temperature you do a diacetyl rest for a lager, so overall, diacetyl rest in an ale = no effect.

Pedro
 

Gough

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I like the 1272 in a range of beers, but I don't think you can go wrong with either yeast in an APA. Both good yeasts, I tend to use the 1272 more often personally...

Shawn.
 

GMK

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OK - Flame suit on - i ahve brewed it at 18 degrees and then raised it to 22-24 for a couple of days - ie as in a diacetyl rest.
It cleans up and tastes better iMHO.

I have also read somewhere about a diacetyl rest benefiting ales - ie at a higher temp than priamry fermentation - cant find/remember the reference now.

I also CC my Ales - guess in your eyes tahts wrong too.

This is the best thing about brewing - u brew for u and use what works for you and what u like.

End of rant....
Glad i have a flame suit...

:)
 

Gulf Brewery

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GMK

Get an ice bath ready, you are going to need it :)

Raising your ale to 23/24 would be no different to leaving the ale at 19 for a day. Yeast scrubs the diacetyl from the beer after it has finished fermenting. It is more effective at 19C, that's why you raise lagers to that temperature. Raising an ale above its fermentation temperature is not going to make any difference.

Pedro
 

GMK

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Ok - might have it a little skewed - here is an excert on a diacetyl rest for ales: ref: http://www.draymans.com/Articles/Diacetyl.php
Method 2
If a warmer primary fermentation temperature was used for ale or lager the diacetyl rest involves either lowering the beer temperature 2 or 3C at the end of primary fermentation or keeping it constant for up to 6 days. In lager yeast strains with low diacetyl production it is common practise nowadays to employ a short diacetyl rest followed by centrifuging to remove excess yeast and then crash cooling to 0C. When brewing ales, that should have very low diacetyl levels especially German Ales like Alt and Klsch, the implications are to not use highly flocculent yeast and to allow an extended primary fermentation, albeit at cooler temperatures until sufficiently low diacetyl levels are reached. Yeast that settles in the cone is still removed on a daily basis.

St pats web site states this:
Interestingly, ales can also benefit from a diacetyl rest on occasion. Fullers in London puts all of their ales through a diacetyl rest by actually lowering the temperature from 20C to 16-17C for one day. However, Fullers ferments under unusually high pressure (20 psi) which leads to high diacetyl.
 

GMK

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here is another excert from the yeast i was using tonight - wyeast 1968...

Wyeast 1968 Special London Activator Pack
Price: $6.50
Quantity in Basket: none

Probable origin: London, England
Beer Styles: British Pale Ales, Special Bitters

Commercial examples may include: Fullers London Pride, Young's and Greene Kings

Unique properties: This extremely flocculant yeast produces distinctly malty beers. Attenuation levels are typically less than most other yeast strains making a slightly sweeter finish. Ales produced with this strain tend to be fairly fruity. Fruitiness increased with higher fermentation temperatures 70-74 F, (21-23 C). Diacetyl production is noticeable and a thorough rest; 50-70 F, (10-21 C) is necessary. Yeast traps trub easily and autolysis is possible. A very good cask conditioned ale strain due to thorough flocculation characteristics. Beers become readily bright within days. Brilliant beers easily achieved without any filtration. Alcohol tolerance approximately 9% ABV. Flocculation - high; apparent attenuation 67-71%. (64-72 F, 18-22 C)
 

sosman

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I have used 1056 and 1272 for APA's but not side by side or with exactly the same recipe so it is difficult to tell. The 1272 certainly comes up nicely and I find it is a good yeast for various other brews too.
 

Guest Lurker

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Yes I did a split batch, and about 10 AHB people tasted them side by side. As I recall nearly everyone was able to distinguish between 1056 and 1272 in a blind tasting, based on fruitiness, but opinions differed over which was the best. But, in that case the 1272 batch finished 2 points higher, and those that preferred the 1056 pointed out the lack of residual sweetness. So personally, I prefer 1272 now, which definitely accentuates hop fruitiness, but only if you pay attention to yeast health and get good attenuation.
 

Ross

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GMK,

I bring my ales up in temp for a couple of days at the end of ferment, as it really seems to knock those last few points off, don't think it has any diacetyl benefits though...
 

deebee

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I was at the taste test GL refers to and I preferred the 1272 by a flea's apendage. You could certainly tell them apart but they were very close and both great beers. Without having the beers in front of me (*sigh*) my memory tells me it was the fruitiness of the 1272 that won it for me.
 

warrenlw63

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Having used both as much as I prefer 1272, I find 1056 a little more suitable for an APA.

1272 just reminds me of a fairly clean English Ale Yeast. Which means you could probably substitute a lot of English yeasts for it. This in some ways makes it more suitable for a wider variety of applications.

I like 1056 for its clean, dry neutral flavour. Lets the hops really jump out. Seems to rob the beer of a lot of malt flavours though.

Warren -
 

Stratis

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I did a split batch once for an APA. The 1272 is a bit more estery and malty. If you want a nice clean APA which accentuates hops then go with the 1056.
 

jayse

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I like 1272 better aswell, but i must admit i haven't used 1056 in a couple years.
All the same I have tasted too many APA's from other brewers to even try to recall. In the end you could make a beer that is better than one used with the other yeast and next batch it might work the otherway around. Or another brewers spilt batch is better with the other yeast.
Some brewers spilt batchs i think may be very easy to pick the difference in the two but i would also pressume some brewers could make beers where you couldn't tell them apart that easily.
Anyway in the end for me 1272 has more of a 'wow' factor.
You don't really get references to 'wow' in brewing text but its there.



The song remains the same.
Jayse
 

Mr Bond

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Doing some research(via the search function) and came across this thread,thought it was worth a drag up.

I will(thanks to a brew buddy) be getting some 1272 soon,and thinking of trying it on an APA.
Given that its a little more fruity in the finish would it be wise to up the IBU's by 5 or more.I was thinking 36 ish, but may be able to get away with 42 ish.

For the record I will use a combination of challenger and cascade for the experiment.

Any one got anything to add.

Meanwhile I'm reading my way through the skunkfart thread(again :rolleyes: ) to try and arrive at a Grain bill.
Ahhhh....the possibilites

Of course there is still the aussie pale to bottle, the dunkel weizen to rack and another weizen variation (with a little munich)to be brewed this weekend(cool spell).

Cheers dave.
 

Ross

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Brauluver,

I haven't tried the 1272, but guess it's long overdue to do so. I love the 1056 but also the ESB 1968 works really well. Recently used the London III 1318, in a Summer Ale & an American Amber - both have turned out really nice & given me the lower FG I was after...

cheers Ross
 

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