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Looking for a sour dough starter


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#1 Ducatiboy stu

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 06:42 PM

Can any fellow bakers share a small portion of there sour dough starter.

 

Will go to a good cause  :)



#2 Airgead

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 08:10 PM

Drop me a pm with your address.... Fred my sourdough starter is getting on for 25 years old now.

#3 Mardoo

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:34 PM

For those wanting to make their own, in my 10 years doing "craft" bread all my best starters started with a bunch of unsprayed white wine grapes with some organic apple peel thrown into a slurry of 50/50 water and flour. Use red wine grapes when making rye-based starters. Sourdough Rye/Anise Seed Bread, OMFG!

Edited by Mardoo, 19 May 2017 - 10:03 PM.


#4 Ducatiboy stu

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:41 PM

Thanks guys

 

I am kinda thinking that if I get  some different ones I will combine them to see what happens



#5 Ducatiboy stu

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:46 PM

I am going to get some organic Rye flour and try starting my own as well



#6 MartinOC

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:47 PM

For those wanting to make their own, in my 10 years doing "craft" bread all my best starters started with a bunch of unsprayed white wine grapes with some organic apple peel thrown into a slurry of 50/50 water and flour. Use red wine grapes when making eye-based starters. Sourdough Rye/Anise Seed Bread, OMFG!

Get thee behind me, Satan!?

 

Or maybe "Come-in me old son & have a cup of tea & let's have a chat"...



#7 Airgead

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:51 PM

I started fred maybe 25 years ago. 50/50 slurry of flour and water. Can't remember what else I did. Has been going strong ever since.

I feed him on white bakers flour but he makes a very nice rye loaf as well.

#8 Mardoo

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:57 PM

Mixing and matching, you end up with some cultures/traits becoming dominant and some suppressed, just like in combining yeast cultures. This can be desirable or not. Sourdough cultures are more generational than beer yeasts, simply because every split of the mother is a new generation. Starters go through ups and downs and sidewayses and you have to ride those out to get something that's life-time stable. Often that ride can take a couple years.

At the best bakery I worked with we had a 3-month dry run, followed by a 3-month cold open to work out how the sours were going to stabilise in day-to-day baking. Those folks were fucking committed to bread! Our sour fridge had about 30 small buckets of different established sours, blends, and new sours we were working with and on. Totally inspiring place to bake.

My opinion, if you get some of Airgead's culture absolutely keep and build a pure sample. Mix and match if you like, but it's damn easy to lose a special characteristic to a newly dominant bacterial strain.

Starters can easily be their own little obsessive world. Take the slippery slope of brewing, pour some sour dough starter down it and you'll reach terminal velocity.

#9 Mardoo

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:59 PM

Thinking about it I bet you'd get some interesting starters out of unsprayed mango peel and lychee skins.

#10 Mardoo

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 10:04 PM

Get thee behind me, Satan!?

Or maybe "Come-in me old son & have a cup of tea & let's have a chat"...

I'd settle for being able to fall asleep...just can't shake the wakes tonight.

#11 Ducatiboy stu

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 10:04 PM

Dont worry, I shall treat a starter like yeast. ALWAYS keep some of the original and with respect  :)

 

But the idea of playing with and mixing to suit what I do appeals

 

Have to remember that the climate is also different which will change how a dough will work, which is another reason it would be nice to get some different starters, just like yeast


Edited by Ducatiboy stu, 19 May 2017 - 10:06 PM.


#12 Mardoo

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 10:14 PM

Starters are way cool.

https://youtu.be/mSfa56tjBQo