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fermenting cider under pressure question


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#1 Maheel

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 09:27 AM

I bought my self a spunding valve thing and until i find a bigger ferment fridge for a 50L keg i am going to ferment in a corny under pressure.

 

Any reason i should not ferment a cider under pressure?

 

What pressure and temp do you suggest ?

 

Just thinking cheap bottled juice for testing it out on...



#2 wobbly

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 09:43 AM

The Williamswarn process uses SO-4 yeast at 23C and 1.5bar (20psi) with fermentation being finished in around 9 days

 

Cheers

 

Wobbly



#3 Danscraftbeer

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 12:19 PM

I've done 1 cider pressure fermented in a 23lt corny. Same process as beer. I ferment at the lower end of the yeast temp recommendation but warmer is OK especially for cider. Nothing wrong with getting esters in cider. Finished ferment at 23psi. I think It was well and done in 8 days and left it for 12 days then chilled for 3 days then co2 pressure transferred into an 18lt keg and on tap.


Edited by Danscraftbeer, 04 January 2017 - 12:21 PM.


#4 Airgead

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 02:16 PM

Why not just unscrew the pressure relief valve on the keg and bung an airlock in? Then you can just ferment in a corny as normal without having to farnarkle around fermenting under pressure...

#5 manticle

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 03:29 PM

I think the idea is to deliberately ferment under pressure though, Airgead. I believe there are advantages (speeding the process up is one of those).



#6 Airgead

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 03:35 PM

Attached File  images.jpg   16.4KB   8 downloads

You must learn patience...

#7 Danscraftbeer

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 04:26 PM

You may not realise all the advantages until you do it. Ferment finishes naturally carbonated for one of the advantages. No secondary/priming sugar measurements or forced carbonations. No exposures is another big advantage option.  

and, and, less waiting! Ales can be on tap in 8 days from brew day. There is more.... :D



#8 Maheel

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Posted 04 January 2017 - 05:34 PM

You may not realise all the advantages until you do it. Ferment finishes naturally carbonated for one of the advantages. No secondary/priming sugar measurements or forced carbonations. No exposures is another big advantage option.  

and, and, less waiting! Ales can be on tap in 8 days from brew day. There is more.... :D

 

 

all of these and i got some gift vouchers for xmas and thought i am going to buy a few toys for the brewery so i can try some new things.

 

kind of bought things i prob would not have with my own coins if you know what i mean



#9 decr

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 07:51 AM

Damn now this really makes me want to get kegs finally. Argh.

#10 Maheel

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Posted 10 January 2017 - 10:55 AM

so my woolies cider (and under the lid coopers yeast) is down to about 1008 from 1040 from Thursday 5th.

 

 

It's getting dry and i was wondering if i should cold chill it now to leave just a hint of sweetness....

i was thinking i could let it pressure up a little more to say 15-20psi, pull the spunding off and today chuck the keg in the keezer and let it go cold.

 

thoughts ?

too soon ?

 

it's a random experiment so i could test the spunding but it would be good if it's drinkable

it taste's ok, i am not realy a cider drinker, wife thought is seemed ok, bit warm at 20c....