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Belgian Pale Ale


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#1 Chris79

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Posted 11 October 2016 - 02:59 PM

Hi,

I'm looking to brew in the next month a Belgian Pale Ale. I have put this recipe through Beersmith that I have recently bought. I've had a look at recipes at BYO and Beersmith - and under recipes on AHB too :) I've also just bought Gordon Strong's Brewing Better Beer. He has a Belgian Pale Ale recipe with Belgian pale ale malt, Vienna malt, biscuit malt, caramunich, aromatic, and a touch of debittered black malt.

 

How different, will it be in flavour and colour with using Belgian pilsner over Belgian pale ale? Sounds like vienna malt/munich malt/biscuit/aromatic seem fairly common.

 

Seems like Saaz, Syrian Goldings, EK Goldings are in keeping with style.

 

The yeast, I added to the recipe, is not necessarily what I'm going to use. I'm still reasonable happy with rehydrating dry yeast that suits the style. So a few ideas there would be cool.

 

Cheers

Chris

 

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#2 RobW

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Posted 11 October 2016 - 03:16 PM

I believe that the best Belgian pales are simple - 85-90% pils or belgian pale malt and 10-15% Munich/Vienna.

Styrian goldings work well especially late (but with restraint) though you really do need a Belgian yeast to get the proper flavours.

I prefer Wyeast Ardennes started at 20oC and allowed to slowly rise with fermentation over 4-5 days until it reaches 25-26oC



#3 Les the Weizguy

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Posted 11 October 2016 - 07:18 PM

I like Jamil's De Koninck tribute pale ale, with Belgian pils malt and Belgian Caramunich and biscuit.

BYO magazine Jul-Aug 2008.

Kent Goldings for bittering and aroma, and Wyeast PC Belgian Schelde yeast.

 

Really appealed to my tastebuds.

 

*Edit:   T-58 dry yeast is probably OK, as is S-33 (which I have used for a Belgian Blonde)


Edited by Les the Weizguy, 11 October 2016 - 07:29 PM.


#4 manticle

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Posted 11 October 2016 - 07:25 PM

Halve the biscuit and aromatic.

I'd suggest all pils for the base but at least drop either munich or vienna.

Liquid yeasts are the best choice for Belgian - dry is too limited.

#5 Danscraftbeer

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Posted 11 October 2016 - 07:42 PM

M27 is the easy grab dry yeast I'd go for. That's actually the only one I've used and willing to do it again.



#6 Chris79

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Posted 11 October 2016 - 08:34 PM

Thanks for all the replies, thus far.

 

@RobW - Cheers. How late for the Syrian Goldings? 30 min. What's distinctive about the Wyeast Ardennes?

 

@Les - cheers. What do you like about the Wyeast PC Belgian Schelde?

 

@Manticle - thanks again. What will using vienna or munich malt over the other one bring to the overall flavour? What liquid yeast would you choose? 

 

@Dan, thanks mate. If I don't go a liquid yeast, which sounds like a real good idea, than that'll be my back.



#7 Danscraftbeer

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Posted 11 October 2016 - 08:52 PM

I only chose Dry yeasts mostly because its more hardy for transport. That makes it more reliable also considering postage now is slower etc or there is something I'm not up with but liquid yeasts haven't done me any favours in my trials. Maybe I've just had bad luck there.

Liquid yeast is more vulnerable to postage and transport variables? I think that's fair to say. 


Edited by Danscraftbeer, 11 October 2016 - 09:03 PM.


#8 manticle

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Posted 11 October 2016 - 10:35 PM

I'd go vienna or just pils and biscuit/aromatic.

The point with liquid is the range. Any commercial examples you like? Might help influence yeast choice.

#9 Les the Weizguy

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Posted 12 October 2016 - 05:21 AM

Belgian Schelde - it's the flavour profile. soft malt and mild, balanced phenolics, with a tasty blend of esters. I'm drooling now...



#10 Chris79

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Posted 12 October 2016 - 03:10 PM

cheers Manticle on the grain bill. I haven't yet had a commercial example of a Belgian pale. So, not sure what liquid yeast I'd prefer.

 

Thanks Les, I'll keep that in mind.



#11 Matplat

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Posted 12 October 2016 - 03:47 PM

The best dry yeast I have used for a belgian was T-58. Turned out a beautiful beer.

 

I recently used the Mangrove Jacks Belgian Tripel, and it was pretty average.



#12 Chris79

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Posted 12 October 2016 - 08:14 PM

cool, cheers Matplat



#13 shacked

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Posted 12 October 2016 - 08:53 PM

I've made the brewing classic styles Belgian pale and it was just 340g of caramunich II and 125g of biscuit and then castle pils to get to desired gravity (I think mine was about 1.050). I used styrian goldings at 60 and 0 mins to 27ibu (no chill) and WLP530.

I've also made a Belgian pale that was mostly Vienna malt, a small amount of pale and 250g of extremely light crystal (10L). I used danstar abbaye dry yeast on that and it was a cracker. Hops were Ella at 60 & 0.

I'd start with something simple then tinker!! Castle Pilsner is a favorite of mine for Belgians

#14 RobW

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Posted 13 October 2016 - 08:12 AM

Thanks for all the replies, thus far.

 

@RobW - Cheers. How late for the Syrian Goldings? 30 min. What's distinctive about the Wyeast Ardennes?

 

 

10 - 20 minutes.

I like the phenol profile of Ardennes.

Haven't used Schelde but from Les' description it sounds similiar.

 

Wyeast says:

 

One of the great and versatile strains for the production of classic Belgian style ales. This strain produces a beautiful balance of delicate fruit esters and subtle spicy notes, with neither one dominating.

Unlike many other Belgian style strains, this strain is highly flocculent and results in bright beers.



#15 Chris79

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Posted 13 October 2016 - 09:06 AM

Those recipes sounds real good Shacked. I will look at keeping the grain bill simple, as a few have suggested. My starting gravity is about 1050 too.

 

Sounds like the Syrian Goldings will work real well.

 

The Brew Shop, is my local Sydney choice not too far from me. They stock Castle - so think I'll make the main part of the grain bill up with Castle Pils. I'll need to go with a White Labs option, as that's what they stock. I was looking into WLP500, but will keep in mind WLP530.

 

Thanks Rob, I'll factor that hop scheduling timing of the Syrian into my recipe.



#16 Chris79

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Posted 16 October 2016 - 07:20 PM

Ok, here's my revised recipe. I'll look at going the Castle Malting Pils as the base. 

 

Further thoughts on this?

 

 

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#17 Danscraftbeer

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Posted 16 October 2016 - 08:10 PM

Looks good. :chug:



#18 Les the Weizguy

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Posted 16 October 2016 - 09:01 PM

10 - 20 minutes.

I like the phenol profile of Ardennes.

Haven't used Schelde but from Les' description it sounds similiar.

 

Wyeast says:

 

One of the great and versatile strains for the production of classic Belgian style ales. This strain produces a beautiful balance of delicate fruit esters and subtle spicy notes, with neither one dominating.

Unlike many other Belgian style strains, this strain is highly flocculent and results in bright beers.

Sorry to say that I have a problem with Ardennes, and think that the phenols are too harsh and unbalanced. Just taste an Achouffe beer and a De Koninck to help you chosse between them. You may prefer the flavour of Corsendonk, which is available as Leuven yeast



#19 technobabble66

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Posted 16 October 2016 - 09:15 PM

Ok, here's my revised recipe. I'll look at going the Castle Malting Pils as the base.

Further thoughts on this?

Why the 1kg LDME?
I'd just replace it with the Pils malt. More pure flavour in the result. No biggie if unable, but I would if you could.

#20 manticle

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Posted 16 October 2016 - 09:54 PM

Partial mash