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AHB Articles: Brewing Books and Brew Related Readings


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#61 Mardoo

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Posted 07 July 2015 - 05:48 PM

Brewing Clasdic Styles definitely has some good info along those lines. I don't know that either of the following are ideal for you, but I've gotten good tips from the first and really want a good look at the second.

Designing Great Beers is the closest to that which I've seen:
http://www.brewerspu...ic-beer-styles/

I haven't yet gotten to use it but I've heard Brewing Better Beer is along those lines:
http://www.brewerspu...-homebrewers-3/

Edited by Mardoo, 07 July 2015 - 05:49 PM.


#62 Midnight Brew

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Posted 07 July 2015 - 05:51 PM

Designing great beers by Ray Daniels is a really good reference from a recipe structure viewpoint. It explores the ingredients of recipes, a bit of background history of the style and then breaks them down into average percentages based off home brewed and commercial recipes and then has a nice little sum up of dot points at the end of each style.

 

Worth the read.



#63 tumi2

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Posted 15 July 2015 - 12:20 PM

Thanks for the feedback guys. I bought Malt, Hops and Radical Brewing. I have started reading Malt and not yet received Radical brewing.
Will give some feedback once i have read them all.



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#64 Yob

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Posted 11 February 2016 - 07:09 AM

Im just finishing up on "Porters and stouts by Terry Foster" which is a very good read and have just bought "Smoked Beers by Ray Daniels" to complete that journey.

 

The library is really starting to take a god shape, Im trying to get a book every month or so and Im quickly running out of the space I was given inside, seems the library will have to make the trek out to the brewery soon ;)



#65 Inconceivable

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Posted 22 April 2016 - 11:17 PM

For a beginner you can't go past Palmers 'How to Brew' but I also picked up Randy Moshers 'Mastering Homebrew' dirt cheap in electronic format on kindle; it was seriously about $2.50

 

I got Gordon Strong's 'Modern Homebrew Recipes' and 'Brewing Better Beer' and could strongly recommend them both. He's got a very accessible style of writing and I find both books very interesting and helpful

 

I read Mitch Steele's IPA Brewing techniques, Recipes, etc and found it to be an "ok" book. Mitch does have a lot of recipes shared in the back third of the book but writes the recipes in such cryptic styles you'll need a Ouija Board, a calculator, and a dictionary to turn most of them into a usable recipe; it's extremely annoying and it wouldn't have been that hard for him to be less cryptic with the damn recipes.

 

At this early point in my homebrewing career I've found Ray Daniels 'Designing Great Beers' to be too intimidating and so would suggest beginners/ intermediates would probably be better served by Gordon Strongs books

 

cheers

Nick


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#66 Jack of all biers

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Posted 28 April 2016 - 10:21 PM

Bronzed Brews.  Australian Brewing history with historical Australian beer recipes for All Grain Home brewers.  Its a great book that has been raved about at this post http://aussiehomebre...stralian-beers/



#67 evildrakey

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Posted 08 July 2016 - 11:19 AM

For those interested in Historical Recipes I can strongly recommend Cindy Renfrow's A Sip Through Time.

 

https://www.amazon.c...g/dp/0962859834

 

She makes no attempt at modern versions of the over 400 hundred recipes presented, but does identify most of the herbs used in the recipes (some recipes contain rare or unusual plants, and some toxic herbs as well).  There's also no guessing at recipes either, it's simply translated or transcripted recipes.

 

She does recipes all the way from Ancient Greek to Victorian England.



#68 mmmyummybeer

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Posted 11 July 2016 - 11:56 PM

Im just finishing up on "Porters and stouts by Terry Foster" which is a very good read and have just bought "Smoked Beers by Ray Daniels" to complete that journey.
 
The library is really starting to take a god shape, Im trying to get a book every month or so and Im quickly running out of the space I was given inside, seems the library will have to make the trek out to the brewery soon ;)



Probable need a big shelf for RIS books alone, let alone the others.

#69 Mardoo

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Posted 12 July 2016 - 04:39 AM

I'm going to get Ron Pattinson's book on stouts and porters. Would be a worthy addition to that shelf. He's the guy who dug up the Courage 1914 IS recipe.

#70 Jrrj

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Posted 26 July 2016 - 03:01 PM

What i am after is something that focuses on learning and crafting recipe from a technical viewpoint but also from the flavour creation viewpoint with flavour more a priority over technical.. Ingredients and their impact on flavour stuff is what im after. 

 

I would second the suggestions on Designing Great Beers (Ray Daniels) and Brewing Better Beer (Gordon Strong). I also found the Malt book from the ingredients useful in this context. Like you, I started with Palmer, and I found these books reinforced and expanded on Palmer really well.



#71 Mattrox

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Posted 13 August 2016 - 11:31 AM

Was just in the bookshop and saw Brew by James Morton.

 

It runs through all the basic techniques and is aimed at beginner --> intermediate brewers.

 

Being new to all grain, I found the recipe section very informative. 

 

Good thing father's day in coming up.



#72 Stouter

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Posted 12 December 2016 - 04:58 PM

About half way through 'Malt', by John Mallett.  So far it's a good mix of technical, practical, and historical information.  The technical and scientific parts are a little heavy for me on the first read but I'll revisit later, no doubt over and over until it sticks.  Also some great conversational inclusions from the Author with a variety of Brewers and Maltsters ranging from homebrewer, to microbrewer, and further on to the mass production and larger scale players.

It's prodding me to investigate more into Australian and more so my local varieties of Barley and malting. 

Slowly working my way to getting the full series of these.  The 'Yeast' installment was hard work and I put it down to rest the brain and read 'Malt'.

 

I've said it before but keep repeating it, "I wish I'd listened in Science lessons at school".


Edited by Stouter, 12 December 2016 - 04:58 PM.