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Malt Extracts


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#1 hazz20

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Posted 10 September 2008 - 06:04 PM

Hey everyone, again,
I've been getting some conflicting advice in relation to boiling my malt extract. My LHBS says to just chuck it into the fermenter and not worry about boiling it up. Is there any need to boil my malt extracts?
Also as I progress into extracts and partials does the maltodextrin go out the window?

Thanks again,

Hazz

#2 KGB

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Posted 10 September 2008 - 06:07 PM

I've never bothered boiling although I've been using DME. Are you using dried or liquid?

#3 hazz20

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Posted 10 September 2008 - 06:16 PM

I've never bothered boiling although I've been using DME. Are you using dried or liquid?


A bit of both, liquid wheat malt as well as dried malt.

#4 Bribie G

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Posted 10 September 2008 - 06:35 PM

If you go to the Coopers site there's a step-through presentation on how they brew their beers and make their extracts and kits. The malt is mashed, sparged, boiled in the kettle and at that stage the proteins in the wort 'break out' and are left behind in the boiler. The wort is cooled and this results in a 'cold break' when more protein breaks out and is removed. The resulting wort is then vacuum concentrated to become liquid malt extract and some is spray dried to become dried malt extract. Morgans also describe their products as 'kettled' so obviously the same applies.

The only reason I could see to boil malt extract is to break out proteins that could otherwise cause hazes in your beer, but apparently this has been done already so no need to boil.

However: I usually bring light dried malt extract up to the boil for a minute to 'sanitize' it because I buy it in kilo bags that have been re-bagged by a human so, unlikely as it may seem, Ross may have sneezed in it while bagging :P :lol:

EDIT: Maltodextrin sounds nice and malty doesn't it? Wrong. It's just an unfermentable carbohydrate made from rice, potatoes or who knows. The malt part of the name is purely coincidental. Definitely ditch it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dextrin

Edited by BribieG, 10 September 2008 - 06:39 PM.


#5 buttersd70

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Posted 10 September 2008 - 09:59 PM

+1 with Bribie, and for the same reasoning. To my way of thinking, tins (and therefore liquid malt) are sterile and hermetically (?spelling) sealed, wheras the bags (ie dry) are not.
The only time I bother boiling liquid is if I need to for correct isomorisation of hops if I am doing an all liquid brew.

#6 Tim

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Posted 10 September 2008 - 10:48 PM

hazz20, you havn't mentioned if you are using cans of extract or buying it from a bulk drum. If you are buying it uncanned (ie bulk drum - most likely in a tupperware or chinese container), then you should boil it to sanitze. If it is a coopers can of extract, then don't bother as its already sterile.

Also that reference to the coopers website and their extract by BribieG fails to mention that extracts are boiled under reduced pressure which lowers the boiling point. Its most likely they have a system which allows boiling at pasteurization temperature ~63-71 degrees C, which may or may not be sufficient to form break material. But as a rule of thumb, if its canned, then don't bother boiling!

#7 buttersd70

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Posted 10 September 2008 - 11:04 PM

From the Coopers FAQ (http://coopers.com.a...hbrew.php?pid=4)

Should I boil the kit to remove break?
We brew beer, malt extract and home brew worts in the same way. All worts are boiled and produce hot break which is then removed in the whirlpool. Rather than being cooled down for fermentation, the malt extract and home brew worts are centrifuged and transferred to evaporators where all but around 20% of the water is removed. At this stage the malt extract and home brew is packaged then cools down but does not throw cold break material because the extract is too dense for it to precipitate.

Once you add water, the wort becomes thin enough for the break material to precipitate. This break material is completely harmless to the brew and will settle out during fermentation.

If boiled the break material may clump together giving the impression, incorrectly, that it is hot break. Boiling home brew (hopped malt extract) will only darken the brew and drive of hop aroma.

However, if you are following a specific recipe and using additional hops, you may like to boil some of the malt extract to achieve the expected hop utilisation for correct aroma, flavour and bitterness in the finished beer.



#8 sponge

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Posted 10 September 2008 - 11:09 PM

hazz20, you havn't mentioned if you are using cans of extract or buying it from a bulk drum. If you are buying it uncanned (ie bulk drum - most likely in a tupperware or chinese container), then you should boil it to sanitze.


Exactly what i was going to say

If its in one of the chinese containers then boil it as its been out of the drum, had a chance to come into contact with a lot of air and whatever else (re dust). also, just to make sure the packer of the extract was mabe not all that clean... so yea, if its in a chinese container, boil away for 5-10min

#9 RobboMC

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 01:17 PM

Most likely if your starting to ditch the sugars and start using liquid malt that pretty soon you're going to need extra hops to balance the sweetness of that extra malt. Most kits only have enough bittering to cover 500g of malt, if that.
The you need to start boiling at least some of your liquid malt for another reason, adding hops.

When you start doing that you are on the road to brewing heaven! Good luck.